Calc bc vs ab

<p>A lot of people take calculus ab because they say bc is insane and a crazy workload. If I put in the required effort is it really that bad?</p>

<p>Calculus BC will be like a typical one year university freshman calculus course.</p>

<p>Calculus AB will be like a slower paced version covering about half of a typical one year university freshman calculus course.</p>

<p>Students who are good at math should be able to handle BC.</p>

<p>Students who take AB will have to take second semester freshman calculus at university / BC pace after they enter university. Some students find that to be a shock after the slow pace of AB.</p>

<p>My school waits until senior year to offer Calc AB. </p>

<p>There's a mandatory 6 week summer course and throughout the year it is a double period. </p>

<p>Calc AB is still difficult, just take that into account as i don't know what kind of school you go too.</p>

<p>^my school works the same way except for the summer course part.</p>

<p>at my school, there is some serious grade inflation in Calc BC. As in kids getting 3s on the exam and a 95 in the class</p>

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<p>When I went to high school, there was only one section of calculus -- BC. It was taught in a normal single period (approximately the same amount of class time as a university freshman calculus course), with no additional summer courses. Students generally were seniors (and the rare junior) who had completed precalculus (usually honors) the previous year (a year ahead of normal schedule). And students did get A grades in the class and 5 scores on the BC test.</p>

<p>Something is seriously odd if your school requires twice the class time (double period) to teach half the material (AB) that a university freshman calculus course teaches. After all, students who reach calculus in high school are supposed to be the ones good at math, since they are a year ahead in math.</p>

<p>BC is not at all insane. The tests are easy if you know the material, which doesn't require much studying. Even if you're not a math person, if you listen in class, do the homework, and study for an hour, you should be set. As for workload, varies from school to school but it's generally not too hard and not too much, because after all, how many exercises can they assign? They just end up being formulaic after you do enough, so most teachers don't assign a huge amount. If they do, though (you should talk to former students to ascertain this), like I said, you will get used to them because a lot of problems will be similar. The AP test is a joke.</p>

<p>At my school, higher math kids split between AB and BC. Many AB say it's too slow and many BC say it's too fast.</p>

<p>"When I went to high school, there was only one section of calculus -- BC. It was taught in a normal single period (approximately the same amount of class time as a university freshman calculus course), with no additional summer courses. Students generally were seniors (and the rare junior) who had completed precalculus (usually honors) the previous year (a year ahead of normal schedule). And students did get A grades in the class and 5 scores on the BC test.</p>

<p>Something is seriously odd if your school requires twice the class time (double period) to teach half the material (AB) that a university freshman calculus course teaches. After all, students who reach calculus in high school are supposed to be the ones good at math, since they are a year ahead in math. "</p>

<p>Sorry don't know how to quote lol</p>

<p>Sadly, even then kids don't pass it.
out of a 30 person APUSH class i took last year as a sophomore 3 people passed. i got a 4 and there was a 3 and a 4. </p>

<p>Nobody scores higher then a 30 on the ACT in my school if that tells you anything.</p>