California schools hard to get into for out-of-state?

<p>The US News and World Report "Best Universities" report shows that most of the University of California schools have 90%+ students in the top 10% of their high school class. Does an out-of-state student in the top 25-30% GPA, but with high SAT/ACT scores, have any chance at all of getting into UCSB, UCSD, or UCSC?</p>

<p>absolutely, they love out of state students because they are paying 20k more a year ...</p>

<p>As a point of reference, the UCLA website shows that UCLA is composed of 93% in-state California, 4% out of state and 3% international. I think that if UCLA loved those out of stater's tuitions, the 4% number would be a tad higher. Does 4% not tell you just how hard it is to get into California from OOS?!!</p>

<p><<the ucla="" website="" shows="" that="" is="" composed="" of="" 93%="" in-state="" california,="" 4%="" out="" state="" and="" 3%="" international.="">></the></p>

<p>it is because there are so many more CA students applying to UCLA, I believe the acceptance rate is essentially the same ...
assuming you have 500 students applying, 465 is CA, 20 is OOS and 15 is international
if they accept 20% in each category, in other words, 100 students get accepted, you get 93 CA, 4 OOS and 3 international</p>

<p>UCs are starting to accept more out of state students to raise more money because of the debt problem in california</p>

<p>who knows how significant the increase in OOS admissions will be compared to last year, probably not a HUGE difference</p>

<p>according to this, it appears that a lot of the OOS students who are admitted choose not to go to UCLA. of the 3,000 admitted, only ~400 or so end up going, most likely because the cost of attending is so high</p>

<p>"UCLA received over 10,000 applications from out-of-state and international freshman applicants for the fall 2010 term. Over 3,000 of them were admitted."</p>

<p>General</a> FAQs - UCLA Undergraduate Admissions</p>

<p>It's much lower for OOS. This has come up before several times on cc. Do a google search on admission statistics for the 2010 class at UCLA and UC Berkeley. The OOS admission rate is about 1/2 the instate rate, and arguably the OOS candidates are stronger. In practice for OOS applicants it is almost as hard to get into UCLA and UC Berkeley as to some of the most selective colleges.</p>

<p>It's an emerging urban legend that the UCs are opening their doors for OOS students because of budget issues. They are planning to increase the OOS percentage a bit, but I expect that the number of applicants will grow in proportion to the increase so that the acceptance rate won't really change. In the future the flagship UCs are likely to become increasingly independent of state funding.</p>

<p>this site actually has more clear info</p>

<p>Profile</a> of Admitted Freshmen, Fall 2009 - UCLA Undergraduate Admissions</p>

<p>it is easier to be accepted to UCLA out of state than instate. the out of state admit rate is 30% opposed to the in state admit rate of 21%, but like i said in my previous post, the enroll rate of out of state students is a lot lower, which can make people easily misconstrue the data</p>

<p>Thanks - sounds hard to get into UC as OOS. Even if they are taking 30% of the OOS applicants, they are all probably in the top 5-10% of their HS... uggg. I test pretty well, SAT 2050 from last (sophmore) year, should be higher this year, I also did well on PSAT, and am a national merit semi-finalist, but only have GPA 3.8 weighted.... doubt I could make UCBerkeley or UCLA but am hoping for santa barbara or san diego?</p>

<p>
[quote]
I think that if UCLA loved those out of stater's tuitions, the 4% number would be a tad higher. Does 4% not tell you just how hard it is to get into California from OOS?!!

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Hopefully you will take a Stats course before long. :)</p>

<p>The reason that UC's have a low % of OOS is COST, first and foremost. Why pay $55-60k/yr when, with the same stats, one could earn a near of full-ride at most local state Uni. It's just a poor investment. (Second reason is geography.)</p>

<p>
[quote]
It's much lower for OOS. This has come up before several times on cc.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>And every time it comes up, such statements are just incorrect. The real numbers are available for all to see on UC Statfinder: historically, OOS admissions has been slightly more difficult, but that slight difference can easily be adjusted by examining tests scores by income levels. The OOS applicants to UC are much wealthier than instate applicants, and tend to have much higher test scores on average.</p>

<p>
[quote]
In practice for OOS applicants it is almost as hard to get into UCLA and UC Berkeley as to some of the most selective colleges.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>The same is becoming true for unhooked instate applicants. Last year, Cal rejected a kid from our instate HS that was accepted to Stanford and wait-listed at H. UCLA rejected a kid who received merit money from Hopkins.</p>

<p>Could it just be because there are MUCH less oos applying for ucla? I really want to go to UCLA but I'm in ny..:(</p>

<p>You did see the part about cost for OOS, right? And you will get NO aid. And you can expect significant tuition hikes every year. The UC system is in deep financial trouble.</p>