career fair: when company reps tell you to apply online, is that a runaround?

<p>I feel like company reps give out interviews to the ones they like, and the just give handouts to those they don't really like.</p>

<p>It's not all the time though. I mean sometimes, the reps are from H&R, and don't have a clue, so they just direct you to their website.</p>

<p>Other times, they are honest and tell you that they don't have any openings.</p>

<p>What are people's thoughts on this?</p>

<p>Depends on the company. Some companies require everyone to apply online. Some companies just don't want to talk to you.</p>

<p>Sometimes they're just there to raise awareness of their company.</p>

<p>Most career fairs I went to during college were staffed by first year employees who graduated from my school. These people had information about the companies and were happy to give business cards and take resumes, but they had absolutely no control over exactly who got interviews. </p>

<p>Many companies require an online application before beginning the hiring process, so no I don't find it strange that they would request you apply before getting an interview. :)</p>

<p>Couple of days ago, NPR did a piece on how people are getting hired. They said that the companies are using screening software that look for key words in the resume. I don't think they are putting you off but giving you a realistic picture.</p>

<p>If you are in a hot field, or specialty, they may take a resume and do a 30 minute interview-which will then either put you into the next round or in the circular file.</p>

<p>Many companies ask applicants to fill on line forms first so that they can do background check in legal and personal matters before interviewing.</p>

<p>how do you become good at the 30 second interview?</p>

<p>What I did was introduce myself, and tell them why I'm interested in the company. I let them look at my resume, and let them ask the questions. I think it's really dumb to prepare a speech on how awesome I am. If I were them, I wouldn't want me to ramble on about how my research would help me be a good employee/intern for them.</p>

<p>IMO, it's best to relax, yet know to think on your feet; this lets them to get to know the real you. I think it's the worst to have to rehearse a speech to all possible answers, because it will be real clear to them that you memorized these answers. I mean it's easy to please them with keywords like "motivated" "team player" and whatnot. Is this how you guys go about these things?</p>

<p>Chicks love talking about themselves.
Ask them about themselves, their company, sex life, background or whatever it is that gets them talking and keep them talking about themselves. </p>

<p>No one really cares that you were president of your honors society or that you spent a summer doing ***** work.
Career fairs for them are about finding people they'd enjoy working with, not the smartest person on paper. If you walk up to someone and recite your resume, you're not going to get a second date.</p>

<p>
[quote]
IMO, it's best to relax, yet know to think on your feet; this lets them to get to know the real you. I think it's the worst to have to rehearse a speech to all possible answers, because it will be real clear to them that you memorized these answers. I mean it's easy to please them with keywords like "motivated" "team player" and whatnot. Is this how you guys go about these things?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Keep in mind that having at least some semblance of a rehearsed speech shows that you have some sort of preparation skills and you're taking them seriously. While I agree memorizing a speech and giving it verbatim is seldom the way to go, having practiced your planned speech a bunch really helps keep your thoughts in order and lets you flow away from and back to what you mean to talk about a lot easier.</p>

<p>some companies only take resumes online officially</p>

<p>but, of course they can pull the resumes they want out of the ones submitted online, so they can pull yours if they want you.</p>