Careers outside of software w/CS degree (vs. engineering)

<p>Every major I consider has issues.</p>

<p>I thought I was going to be an engineer, but now that doesn't seem too likely. My visual-spacial skills totally suck. I can't visualize anything 3D, I can't even sketch a cube. This makes a lot of physics really, really hard.</p>

<p>Logic is better. I understand math when it is not visual.</p>

<p>Working on something real that I could actually see built would be cool. I don't think I will ever be able to see software as interesting. It just doesn't matter to me.</p>

<p>If I got a degree in computer science with a theory track, could I get a job not related to computing? Something more tangible?</p>

<p>With that kind of attitude, the sky's the limit.</p>

<p>
[quote]

If I got a degree in computer science with a theory track, could I get a job not related to computing? Something more tangible?

[/quote]

Maybe working for the federal government as a special agent (FBI, etc.).
But just having a degree in computer science won't get you there. You are competing against applicants that have all the following:
-Graduate degree in CS/EE or maybe even a combination
-Foreign language proficiency in a target language such as Mandarin Chinese or Arabic
-Extensive tactical experience (from combat tours)
-Outstanding physical fitness</p>

<p>I wasn't having a good day. Disregard the negative tone of that post.</p>

<p>The question still stands, however.</p>

<p>kkuo: That would be very cool. Wish I spoke Mandarin.</p>

<p>You don't have to be a software engineer. You could double major with chemistry or physics or neuroscience or cognitive science. Do research, data analysis. Computational theoretical chemistry, computational biology, bioinformatics - there's a lot to be done outside of software engineering, imho.</p>

<p>Also, there's finance, especially if you do a math minor. A lot of the cool theory stuff will be in R&D. There's jobs that require clearance (like at Raytheon, for example: Raytheon</a> Open House Hiring Event) developing satellite tech (I think this is really cool for some reason, lol), and jobs at places like JPL. If you're going to go the theory route, I'd suggest graduate school. You don't have to stay in academia after you get your PhD. </p>

<p>See here: Nonacademic</a> Employers That Hire PhDs — PhDs.org: Science, Math, and Engineering Career Resources</p>