Chances for an OOS? Thanks!!

<p>Girl, White
4.3ish GPA, Ranked 1 out of ~300
32 ACT (36 Reading, 35 English, 33 Science... 25 Math lmao)
5 APs in all </p>

<p>Varsity Swimming all four years and swim year round, state qualifier, hold high school record that I set freshman year
JV/Varsity Soccer (11,12)
JV Tennis (9) </p>

<p>NHS Secretary
VP of another Honor Society</p>

<p>Volunteered as a swim coach for many hours, also as a volunteer director and as a summer reading and math tutor. Participated in school choir (didn't count as a real class) for 3 years. Altogether will be around ~350 hours documented, most I just did for fun</p>

<p>Your GPA is a bit low but they do look at what you've taken compared to what your school offers, so seeing as you're #1 that might not be an issue. I would suggest taking the ACT again and consider taking the SAT to get the best scores you can. You have pretty good extracurriculars, especially with the volunteering. Make sure that you get really good recommendations, and I think you have a decent chance. Honestly for out of state, it's really tough. So I can't really say that you have a good chance because they've turned away valedictorians before.</p>

<p>thanks! and as for the GPA i really can't get much higher, unfortunately my school doesn't offer very many AP classes for weighting. :(</p>

<p>Are stats available for in-state vs. OOS? I think you have a great chance, btw.</p>

<p>OOS admissions were 17% last year.</p>

<p>I think you have a terrific chance.</p>

<p>@OhioMom3000 I wasn't able to find any OOS v IS stats, I was really curious because I know getting into UNC from out-of-state is extremely daunting! But thanks :)</p>

<p>@MaterMia Thank you!! :)</p>

<p>I'd be surprised if they published them. Seems like you have a great chance. Good luck.</p>

<p>Edit: By the way, I think you have a good chance but some of these admissions decisions are impossible to predict. For instance being a non-legacy really "hurts" (just doesn't help) you in the admission process.</p>

<p>At the bottom are oos vs. instate attending students in the most recent class (fall 2010).</p>

<p>First-Year</a> Full-Time Undergraduate Student Profile, Fall 2010 - Office of Institutional Research and Assessment</p>

<p>just to highlight SATs: </p>

<p>Out of state 648 verbal, 669 Math, 655 Writing and 1318/1600
In state 643 verbal, 658 Math, 634 Writing and 1301/1600</p>

<p>Surprisingly, not that much different in SATs. Though admit rates are much lower for OOS. Last year's difference (if I remember correctly) in SAT was 40 pts out of 1600 and that gap is only 17 this year.</p>

<p>Also, just about legacy and admit rates:</p>

<p>"How are children of alumni judged in the admissions process?
For N.C. applicants, being the child of a Carolina alumnus helps only as a tie breaker. Out-of-state children of alumnu do fare better than others from out of state.The UNC System Board of Governors sets a quota - currently 18 percent - for the number of out-of-state students admitted to the freshman class each year. Carolina sets aside about 80 out-of-state legacy spaces a year, and nonresident legacy applicants enjoy roughly twice the acceptance rate as those who do not have a parent who attended Carolina. In 2006, 39.2 percent of out-of-state applicants who were children of alumni were accepted to UNC; 19 percent of out-of-state applicants whose parents were not alumni."</p>

<p><a href="http://alumni.unc.edu/article.aspx?SID=1839%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://alumni.unc.edu/article.aspx?SID=1839&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>@JohnBlack thanks! and it's good to know test scores for IS/OOS are fairly close, though i suppose recruited athletes may factor into the equation.</p>

<p>Yeah I think the distribution is really interesting. There is a higher proportion of lower-end applicants (below 1000/1600 SATs) for out of state which could very well reflect athletic recruits. </p>

<p>~70% of both instate and OOS attendees scored between 1200-1500 out of 1600. The difference between the majority of these groups is that most instate students scored in the 1300s while most out-of-state students scored in the 1400s. </p>

<p>A 32 puts you in the 1400s range on SAT so I should think you're in the running. I think your class rank really makes you stand out.</p>

<p>I believe that I have read that OOS athlete recruits are not counted as OOS ... they do not count in that 18%.</p>

<p>"I believe that I have read that OOS athlete recruits are not counted as OOS ... they do not count in that 18%."</p>

<p>Now they do. The university was fined last year for over-enrolling out-of-state students due to the rule of athletic recruits not being counted. That rule has since changed.</p>

<p>i'm sure athletes make up a big portion of OOSers for an incoming class, i'll cross my fingers and hope i'll get in! UNC is such a cool place, i'd love to attend.</p>