Cheated Twice in my Sophomore Year of HS

<p>Long story short, i cheated twice my sophomore year in AP European History.</p>

<p>The first time, i was suspended for cheating on a test. I got a 0/50 on the test, and still managed to pass the first semester with a 71%.
The second time, i cheated again in AP Euro, only this time it was on a homework assignment. Now i am being dropped from the course with a permanent F. </p>

<p>Can anyone please provide any insight as to if i will get into college or not, or if some colleges over look this aspect of my academic career?</p>

<p>Bottom Line - This is a negative, and there's no way to get around it. However, it's not the end of the world. You will get into a college, without doubt.</p>

<p>Aright, thanks. Now im just wondering how the hell i break the news to my folks</p>

<p>Speaking as a parent -- do it as soon as possible. Take responsibility for your actions. Do not make excuses. Accept any punishment that they deem appropriate. And most importantly, remember that they love you even if you've screwed up.</p>

<p>Twice? smh... Tell your parents and hope they understand.</p>

<p>You also should sit down with a counselor and talk about why you feel that cheating is an appropriate or necessary behavior. There is a reason for your choice of actions. Until that reason no longer exists, your behavior won't change.</p>

<p>"Long story short, i cheated twice my sophomore year in AP European History.</p>

<p>The first time, i was suspended for cheating on a test. I got a 0/50 on the test, and still managed to pass the first semester with a 71%.
The second time, i cheated again in AP Euro, only this time it was on a homework assignment. Now i am being dropped from the course with a permanent F"</p>

<p>I need to know now, whoever has been through the process, i was wondering if i could still get into a few select schools or how it would impact their decision making in the state (Illinois) like University of Illinois at Chicago, or Northern Illinois University, etc.</p>

<p>cheating once is sometimes excusable. but twice pretty much ruins any chance you have at college, even if you had incredible stats. colleges would doubt every test score you have and discredit any academics. your best option would to start looking at community colleges because cheating is a very serious offense.</p>

<p>I think if it was sophomore year you could still have a chance at attending college. Would your school even put the reason for the F on your transcript? Even if they did, if you wrote a really great essay explaining, apologizing etc., you may find an admissions office willing to accept you.</p>

<p>The main thing to do is to never ever cheat again and get amazing grades for the rest of high school!</p>

<p>I don't think they will overlook it especially if they require the transcript because your record is permanently on the transcript. In my school if you cheat on homework the first time then it's not on your transcript but an F is a big deal too because they might want good explanation of why it's an F and why it was dropped.</p>

<p>I don't think you are 'ruined' and thus 'doomed' to community college. No one in their sophmore year is ruined. Think of all the high school kids with really serious offenses on their school (and police) records - drug-dealing, vandalism, assault...who pull it together and get on with their lives. On the other hand, it won't be ignored either.</p>

<p>What you will have to do is take ownership for some really bad choices and be able to explain why you did it (twice), what's changed and why you wouldn't be tempted to do it again. Your letters of recommendation from both your teachers and your guidence counselor are critical here - you need them to make the case that you have the integrity and maturity not to do this again. </p>

<p>Where to start? First, talk to your parents. They will be disappointed and possibly angry, but ultimately, if they are adequate parents, they are on your side and want to help. Next, have conversations with the guidence counselor and those teachers - they will surely want to know why you did it, and expect both apologies and acknowledgement that you screwed up. Third, consider the possibility that you are under too much pressure to perform (your own or others expectations - or both). An understanding of why you cheated can help you to avoid situations where you might feel pressured to do it again. (happymomof1 is on the money here.) Less demanding classes? Fewer ECs? What will it take to help you avoid that kind of pressure? Finally, consider the possibility that you might want a gap year after high school to think more clearly about what you really want out of life. The clarity that being away from school could bring may be life-changing. When you do apply to college, you'll be able to make a good case for why you aren't the same person you were in 10th grade and why the schools shouldn't hold those lapses in judgement against you.</p>