City College (CCNY CUNY) Grove School of Engineering

<p>I plan on attending CCNY (CUNY City College of New York) and, plan on majoring in civil engineering. This restriction is mainly due to my financial situation not being able to attend a private school. My question is - How does City's engineering program rank compared to PolyTech and SUNY schools? A growing concern of mine is graduating and not being able to find a decent job due to all the competition in today's job market. Any comments/advice would help greatly. Thank You.</p>

<p>it's probably very low in the engineering rankings but the faculty rep makes up for that IMO- if you look at the undergrad catalogue, most of the faculty either got their B.S, M.S, phd or all their degrees from very prestigious universities- princeton,harvard,yale,MIT,cal tech,carnegie mallon, columbia, upenn,stanford, berkeley,cooper union,NYU,cooper union,umich,etc. That must mean something:</p>

<p><a href="http://www1.ccny.cuny.edu/CCNYBulletin/%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www1.ccny.cuny.edu/CCNYBulletin/&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>just go to your major and check the faculty list. It also has course descriptions. More importantly though, look at the semester by semester curriculum for the major you want to pursue- i can find that for you..just tell me your major......</p>

<p>I plan on pursuing a BE in civil engineering and 100 percent plan on attending graduate school. I was informed it is a must since I can only afford CUNY. I wanted to attend PolyTechs Co-Op program; however, I am required to pay about 12000 a year out of pocket which is impossible with my financial situation at CUNY I won't have to pay anything out of pocket and to be brutally honest my parents are on disability and if there is a need to pay there is no way I could enroll full-time. I'd end up doing the night shift at mcdonalds just to afford community college.</p>

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I plan on pursuing a BE in civil engineering and 100 percent plan on attending graduate school. I was informed it is a must since I can only afford CUNY.

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<p>Here is a list of employers that recuit from CCNY:</p>

<p><a href="http://www.ccnycareercenter.org/ccnyemployers_recruitlist.htm%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.ccnycareercenter.org/ccnyemployers_recruitlist.htm&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>There are some top firms on there </p>

<p>as for the dude who told you grad school is a MUST because ccny is a 'crappy
engr. school' i'm not sure about that at all and I would contact some civil engineering professors at the school and ask them if they ever worked in industry and if it was difficult to find jobs. If they tell you you will be like doomed if you graduate from ccny because you won't find a good job then go to CCNY, take a rigorous courseload, get a good G.P.A and transfer to an engineering prog. with a good rep. two years later. OR, like you said, go to a 'name brand' grad school. But i truly feel that CCNY has a very strong, structured engineering curriculum. IMO you should Definitely enroll at CCNY for now- and think about transferring/ grad school later- at least after getting to know nd speaking with C.E. professors there. Read through the undergrad handbook too- it's very informative.</p>

<p>I know quite a few people who were at polytech for undergrad for civil engineering, and none of them were happy about it. They all advise against going there, so that says lots. Most of the poly grads I know are in heavy debt from the high tuition there, so it's definitely not worth it (some were $60k+). Poly's rank might be higher but I really don't think it's worth it. As for SUNY schools, only one of the big universities has a decent civil engineering program, and that's Buffalo. </p>

<p>Competition in the job market? There will be PLENTY of jobs for you, especially if you plan on staying in NYC after graduation. All the civil engineering and construction companies in the city are really desperate for people, so there's no doubt you won't have problems getting interviews. Just look around the city and you'll have an idea of the amount of work out there: Fulton St Transit Hub, World Trade Transit Hub, World Trade Memorial, Freedom Tower, 2nd Ave Subway, City Water Tunnel No. 3, Atlantic Yards, CitiField, Yankees Stadium, Columbia University Manhattanville Campus expansion, the future NYU expansion, etc etc. It's just unbelievable how many projects there are right now, and the number of projects in the future as well. </p>

<p>Grad school immediately after undergrad is not a must unless you plan on pursuing structural engineering. If money is a problem, when you begin looking for full time jobs in 3 1/2 years, look for companies that offer tuition reimbursement. They'll pay for you to take classes part time while working for them full time. Definitely something to consider.</p>

<p>I just graduated with a degree in civil engineering recently (in new york), so definitely feel free to email me if you want to.</p>

<p>Thanks for the reply, perhaps my reasoning was misunderstood by mentioning "Graduate School is a must if going to a CUNY school" I was simply implying that due to low tuition fees ($2800 per year) it would be irresponsible to decide not to pursue a higher degree, especially if aid is given.
I do indeed plan on focusing on structural engineering.</p>

<p>I live in NYc and I learned a long time ago, if you want to do Engineering stay long and clear away from NYC except Columbia, Manhattan college and Cooper union. I'm not smart enough for those 2, so I go 400 miles away. I got into Manhattan, but I wanted to go away and save the extra 15K a year,m</p>

<p>I go to University at Buffalo, a Suny school and we have a darn good Civil program. Most Civil students love to take advantage of the UB Engineering’s Earthquake Engineering Simulation Facility in ketter Hall. The best there is in America.</p>

<p>I go to a State school and I feel I learn just as much, if not more than my Buddies in Cornell and Columbia. Its a really good education and will most likely be cheaper than Cuny City. </p>

<p>While there are many Civil opportunities here in NYC, I would also say that my schools Civil program is about 80% students from NYC.</p>

<p>As for PolyTech, I also have about 15-20 friends who go there. They say is decent, just really expensive and the math is exceptionally hard. </p>

<p>I would check out NYIT or Manhattan college long before POly.</p>

<p>I wish ya the best.</p>

<p>polytech is really expensive.I have suspicion whether it deserves its high tuition.</p>

<p>College is what you make it.
CUNY is not a top school,but you still can do a lot with it.</p>

<p>college IS what you make of it. my prof teaches 20-30 people. some get A's, some fail. I mean who do you wanna be?</p>

<p>I went to NYC public HS and the level of education was just so low, I had to get out of the city. Went to Lehman College for some time, I just couldent take it anymore. It was worse than my HS, even though they claimed to be a great college. Just ther worst of the Worst.</p>

<p>Cuny may be great for law, writing and stuff like that, But math and science they are awful.</p>

<p>you can't just say 'CUNY sucks' though. I mean there are several colleges that make up cuny- some are supposedly awful and some are quite good- city college for instance is great in engineering and has top faculty- just check out their educational backgrounds.</p>

<p>I know people who went to city for engineering, they arer no longer there. Any suny school is better suited for engineering./</p>

<p>That's subjective unless you're talking about job placement/ reputation. IMO if he won't have problems finding a good job or going to a good grad school after graduation, then he should stay there. If he's going to have difficulty finding a nice job if he grads from ccny then he can always transfer out. Remember, he's having financial issues- why not stay at ccny for two years(full ride) and then transfer to SUNY, or columbia, or wherever he wants to go.</p>

<p>The issue with any SUNY school or the like is that my mother is a single parents of 5 living off social security benefits due to disability. with 2 other children at NYU and Syracuse university on scholarships. My mother's contribution to my education will be 0 and its known that engineering students usually don't have time to work their way through school with the workload assigned. CUNY is not Columbia or Cornell, But CUNY is the only "free ride" I can get (fin-aid paying for full tuition.) I need to live-at-home for college, no chance of being able to pay room and board under any circumstances.</p>

<p>Just go to CCNY.</p>

<p>Your EFC will probably be 0, which would mean pell and Tap would pay for all your tuition and fee's here at Buffalo. Given your circumstances ask for a LIving Waiver, so your living is free. you also have Stafford loans and such.</p>

<p>It definitely is possible to work on the side while in school for engineering. For my last two years, I interned for about 15 hours a week during the school year; that's one of the benefits of going to school in a large city. While that won't be able to pay for tuition, its good for some extra spending money (as well as the industry experience).</p>

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I interned for about 15 hours a week during the school year; that's one of the benefits of going to school in a large city

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<p>I really want to do that- what company did you work for? I'm moving to new york city this fall.</p>

<p>Graduated from CCNY in 99' with a Bachelor's of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and currently earn well over 100K, for several years now!
I worked a 40 hr /wk union job and attended day labs by taking vacation days one per week during the required semester and the rest at night.
One summer I took a Themodynamics course and met 4 Columbia University EE students attempting to take this course at 'lowly' CCNY to get credit for their Columbia Degree. Guess what ?only one survived, the rest withdrew from the course.
After 3 years working as an engineer,I had 1 Eng from Columbia and 1 from Manhattan working under me! Both are still in debt!
Bottom line. It's a good school,at a good price and it is very challenging.
I attended private grammer and high schools and graduating with a B-B+ was extremely difficult.
The staff is from "good" engineering schools such as Yale ,MIT & CCNY!</p>

<p>Also note ,unlike private schools the grade scale is A,B,C,D,F period..........no plus and minus.</p>

<p>CCNY school of engineering </p>

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<p>Graduated from CCNY in 99' with a Bachelor's of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and currently earn well over 100K, for several years now!
I worked a 40 hr /wk union job and attended day labs by taking vacation days one per week during the required semester and the rest at night.
One summer I took a Themodynamics course and met 4 Columbia University EE students attempting to take this course at 'lowly' CCNY to get credit for their Columbia Degree. Guess what ?only one survived, the rest withdrew from the course.
After 3 years working as an engineer,I had 1 Eng from Columbia and 1 from Manhattan working under me! Both are still in debt!
Bottom line. It's a good school,at a good price and it is very challenging.
I attended private grammer and high schools and graduating with a B-B+ was extremely difficult.
The staff is from "good" engineering schools such as Yale ,MIT & CCNY!</p>

<p>Also note ,unlike private schools the grade scale is A,B,C,D,F period..........no plus and minus.</p>