College Math Class or Internship

<p>Hi I'm a rising senior and I was pondering my options for senior year. I already finished the highest level math courses at my school (Calculus BC and Statisics); so, for next year, I'm considering taking multivariable calculus/linear algebra at the local university. </p>

<p>Another thing I have the option of doing is an internship at a small accounting firm. However, since both of these take up much time (10+ hours/ week), I really only have time to do one of them.</p>

<p>Except for lab research, I don't any previous work experience. However, math has been my favorite subject and i want to continue with it.</p>

<p>Which one would be more beneficial for me in terms of college admissions? I'm aiming for HYPSM and other top colleges and I want to major in something math-related (finance or engineering most likely). </p>

<p>Thanks</p>

<p>Take the internship. It will add a real-world flavor to your application, and I expect that you'll learn a great deal about the workplace by doing so.</p>

<p>Math beyond AP Calculus C is of marginal value in high school unless you have a track record of exceptional achievement/talent in math -- as through participation on a math team, research projects, etc.</p>

<p>I don't really get why you can't do both</p>

<p>^conflicting times; both are after school on weekdays during the same time slot</p>

<p>@fogcity - thx for the advice. I think the internship will definitely add an extra element to my app. But at the same time, I've been doing math contests, math club, etc. since freshman year and I'm thinking that taking college math will demonstrate my continued passion for math. Both options have their benefits i guess.</p>

<p>I would definitely second fogcity and say take the internship. I'm not sure if the college math class would be online or actually in a class setting, but a few of the smartest boys in my Calc III class decided to take Linear Algebra online and they really struggled through it. And, with it being just a summer course, you will rush through the material fairly quickly and I feel like you wouldn't have time to digest it all and would just end up retaking it in college again. Personally, I think the internship is an all-around much better experience.</p>

<p>I suggest taking the internship only if you really know what it entails. If you would have actual valid work, I think the internship would be the better choice. If you would be just hanging around doing nothing much, or sweeping and mailing envelopes, the math class might be better. Whatever you do, don't succumb to the pressure by MSauce and try to do both - applications are difficult enough!</p>

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But at the same time, I've been doing math contests, math club, etc. since freshman year and I'm thinking that taking college math will demonstrate my continued passion for math.

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I suggest taking the internship only if you really know what it entails. If you would have actual valid work, I think the internship would be the better choice. If you would be just hanging around doing nothing much, or sweeping and mailing envelopes, the math class might be better.

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<p>I agree with GeekMom. Unless you'll be making an impact with your internship, the math class is probably more valuable and more impressive for admissions. At least in my area, getting an internship doesn't mean much except that you have X hours a day to spare after schools. More often than not, kids just end up shadowing investment bankers or doing scrub work.</p>

<p>The internship will help you know what you really want to do, probably. The math class will probably carry more weight, and you'll start learning 'real math' . (Not to downgrade calc in the least, but post-calc math is what the math types I know call 'real math'.) That being said, make sure it is a solid class and not a huge zoo. Linear can be tough and you will almost certainly have to use college resources (aka the professor and TA) for help rather than your friends/parents. (All the kids I know who have done it in high school were fine, but they are a VERY talented bunch.)
What math competitions are you doing?</p>