College Tuition: The Next Bubble to Burst

<p>Found this interesting. Hopefully it burst soon.
8</a> Reasons College Tuition Is the Next Bubble to Burst | Naked Law by Avvo.com</p>

<p>alright, i don't mind paying for college, however its just getting to be too much, why the Heck do they keep riseing it?</p>

<p>^Well, partly because most states are like:</p>

<p>"Liek, OMG! We've gots no moneys!"</p>

<p>"What do we cut?! What do we cut?!"</p>

<p>"Edumacation!"</p>

<p>In addition to the whole college train of thought: "Well, they can just borrow the money!"</p>

<p>truth is that you only need textbooks and a group of students to interact with to learn the material. and then an expert (could be someone on a forum like physicsforums) to learn the material. u phoenix is WAY overcharged. you could learn the equivalent of a BS in physics by just asking questions on physicsforums and torrenting the physics textbooks. srsly.</p>

<p>Agree with IO.</p>

<p>I absolutely hate the stereotype that everyone and their brother needs to go to college, and that you need to go to college in order to learn.</p>

<p>Start making online schools...or testing centers. I don't want to pay for professor's research or the new billion dollar gymnasium or for the nationally ranked football team.</p>

<p>There are some people who probably shouldn't go to college. Not because they are incapable in any way, but because they would be better suited doing something else.</p>

<p>It's so high because people will pay a lot of money for a degree that society says you need. And also because people like me want to go to a ranked and reputable school, and to satisfy that narcassism are willing to take out loans.</p>

<p>Also, Obama wants loans to be forgiven in 20 years for all people, 10 years for people in the public sector- aka gov jobs. </p>

<p>A college degree today is like a hs diploma 25 years ago. Grad school is the new college.</p>

<p>
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I don't want to pay for professor's research

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<p>Actually, professors are helping pay your tuition with their research.</p>

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Actually, professors are helping pay your tuition with their research.

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</p>

<p>Oh? Research they would rather be doing than teaching, no?</p>

<p>If that's what makes it so affordable, I think I'd rather teach myself.</p>

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Oh? Research they would rather be doing than teaching, no?</p>

<p>If that's what makes it so affordable, I think I'd rather teach myself.

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So you don't want services from people who would prefer to be doing something else? Most people don't consider every aspect of their jobs to be their favorite thing in the world to do.</p>

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Actually, professors are helping pay your tuition with their research.

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</p>

<p>Science, engineering, math, etc. professors maybe. Humanities professors certainly aren't bringing in top dollar research grants. And I'd imagine that the endowment subsidizes tuition more so than any amount of research dollars.</p>

<p>Professors aren't hired for their teaching ability at research institutions, but low and behold, their research. Why do I need to pay a researcher to teach me? plz tell</p>

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Most people don't consider every aspect of their jobs to be their favorite thing in the world to do.

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</p>

<p>I think you'll find motivation goes up significantly when you factor in money.</p>

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I think you'll find motivation goes up significantly when you factor in money.

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</p>

<p>There was a recent study at MIT that proved just the opposite when intellectually challenging work is involved. Money as a significant motivating factor only applies to purely rote, mechanical tasks, according to these researchers. I wish I could find the link right now. Surely someone else knows what I'm talking about.</p>

<p>Watched this in my English class. It kinda relates to this topic.
Sir</a> Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution! | Video on TED.com</p>

<p>German universities operate on a budget of $10,000 - $12,000 per student per year and they grant even more research time to professors. (I have never seen a German professor teach more than one course per semester.)</p>

<p>The key is not spending money on anything other than their core mission: no dorms, no gym, no health center, no fancy landscaping, no student activities, no advertising to prospective students. They teach classes, do research, offer academic counseling, run cafeterias and that's pretty much it.</p>

<p>Student unions are responsible for the non-academic life, and they also operate much more cost-efficiently than American colleges. For example, they maintain dorms that rent single rooms to students for $300 a month. (Compare that to the $5,000 many private colleges charge for 8 months of housing.) They might organize PE classes or concerts. Students have to pay for whatever services they utilize, but they don't need to pay for anything else.</p>

<p>American colleges have more and more resemblance to country clubs.</p>

<p>
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you could learn the equivalent of a BS in physics by just asking questions on physicsforums and torrenting the physics textbooks. srsly.

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</p>

<p>you could, but it would be harder, and you'd have to be way more motivated. also the lab classes would be hard to do.</p>

<p>A BS in physics without doing any labs?</p>

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you could, but it would be harder, and you'd have to be way more motivated. also the lab classes would be hard to do.

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</p>

<p>The lab classes would be harder but not impossible. Those could be done at a certain place instead (and students could just pay a fee to share the equipment) - one for each area with lots of physics students. Of course, that isn't possible now, but it is entirely physically possible.</p>

<p>LOL some of these posts are so funny - We don't need to go to college to learn! All we need is a group of students, oh yeah and an instructor, and textbooks, and a place where we can do labs! Haha what do you think you're describing? ;)
[quote]
Professors aren't hired for their teaching ability at research institutions, but low and behold, their research. Why do I need to pay a researcher to teach me? plz tell

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Universities exist for teaching and research. You don't NEED to pay a researcher to teach you, you could simply sit at home on your ass and read Wikipedia (Hey, I've learned a lot that way). You chose to attend a university. And if you're a science major, one of biggest attractions of a research university as opposed to some secluded LAC are the research opportunities. </p>

<p>Oh, and I agree that college is unnecessary for most people. Most people graduate and go into entry-level business jobs which require no knowledge beyond 9th grade. But most jobs these days require a Bachelor's as a minimum requirement, which is why you might as well get one. Plus college is fun, and it gives 18 year olds a chance to mature and learn stuff before getting real jobs. I mean, most of the stuff we learn in K-12 is also unnecessary for jobs, but education isn't just job-training, you know?</p>

<p>I don't know why people pay so much in tuition anyhow. I don't think pricy univerisities are worth it unless they give you generous aid or you're rich. I go to the 2nd most expensive college in the country and so many middle class students are up to their ears in debt, it's sad : (</p>

<p>
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Money as a significant motivating factor only applies to purely rote, mechanical tasks, according to these researchers.

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</p>

<p>Teaching is boring for professors and instructors- it's all rote and mechanical. Instead, we can either- pay our instructors more for better quality, or change the way we learn so it's not as rote.</p>

<p>
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LOL some of these posts are so funny - We don't need to go to college to learn! All we need is a group of students, oh yeah and an instructor, and textbooks, and a place where we can do labs! Haha what do you think you're describing?

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</p>

<p>It might be funny, but the point is you can do most learning, if not all by yourself. Lots of textbooks are watered down, teachers go very slow and should be doing something else with their life, and labs are worthless most of the time.</p>

<p>The fact we have grades in college is a strong sign we aren't there to learn but there for rote memorization. Which anyone can really do on their own time.</p>

<p>I have a feeling college degrees will become worthless in the future. It's nothing more than a separator for the status quo.</p>