Colleges that have nonrestrictive and nonbinding EA

<p>What are some schools that have these types of EA. So far I only know of MIT and UMich, but I am looking for good schools for sciences that do nonrestictive/nonbinding EA.</p>

<p>Well, EA isn't binding, that's ED. And there are 2 types of EA that restrict you. Restrictive EA means you can't apply anywhere ED (a few colleges have this, but I can only think of Boston College), and Single Choice Early Action, which is just Yale and Stanford, I believe. Most schools that have EA are nonrestrictive.</p>

<p>Oh cool. Does anyone know of any good science schools that do EA then?</p>

<p>University of Illinois at Urbana Champlain. It has an amazing engineer program that is arguably as good as MIT and better than Cornell. The school is also relatively affordable even to students from out-of-state, if you want to look into it.</p>

<p>There's also Caltech and Georgia Institute of Technology as well as other schools, depending on which area of science you're most interested in.</p>

<p>if you are interested in an engineering program, Rose Hulman has rolling admission. Although if you are considering applying to MIT I wouldn't think RHIT would be on your list. There's not much overlap in applicants between those two.</p>

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Does anyone know of any good science schools that do EA then?

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<p>MIT, Caltech, Michigan, and UChicago come to mind. I don't know your stats, though.</p>

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University of Illinois at Urbana Champlain. It has an amazing engineer program that is arguably as good as MIT and better than Cornell. The school is also relatively affordable even to students from out-of-state, if you want to look into it.

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<p>U of I's engineering program is definitely not better than MIT's. And even though it is ranked higher than Cornell's, we have to remember that the significant size of the Illinois program will probably make the experiences very different (U of I school ranked as the worst school for undergraduate teaching quality on Princeton Review's student survey). And I believe it costs 38-40 thousands dollars a year, so I wouldn't consider it very cheap.</p>

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And I believe it costs 38-40 thousands dollars a year, so I wouldn't consider it very cheap.

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<p>Mmm, that's almost twice the amount a friend told me that she had to pay for UIUC, so I guess she received some kind of scholarship that made up for the cost. Also, 40k per year should be referring to the CoA, not the tuition. Still, it remains more affordable than many private universities and, if I remember correctly, both UIUC and Georgia Tech offer rolling/early admission programs that would allow you to apply early so that you can potentially have an acceptance in hand before you set your eyes on more selective colleges. </p>

<p>No matter which college it is, make sure you have on your college list a definite low-match/safety that you would genuinely love to attend.</p>

<p>Yeah. From what I read on here I have stats that put me in the range of HYPMS, but even still that's nowhere near absolute admission. U of Michigan seems to be a safety or match and I always have MSU, my dad works there and I could definatly get in to MSU</p>

<p>Actually, griffin, there's some overlap in applications to Rose-Hulman and MIT. My daughter applied to, and was accepted to MIT, Cornell, CalTech, Harvey Mudd, and Rose-Hulman. She chose Rose-Hulman over all the others.</p>

<p>really? why did she make that choice and is she still happy with it? what year?</p>

<p>She's starting as a freshman this year, so I can't give you anything on her actual experiences in the classroom.</p>

<p>She participated in their summer program for rising seniors last summer and absolutely loved it.</p>

<p>Her personality is probably best suited for a small LAC but wants to study engineering (EE). She felt that at the "big name" schools, they really focused more on the graduate students. RH has faculty doing all the teaching (including labs & discussion sessions). She liked the emphasis on team learning environments, smaller class sizes, and a cooperative atmosphere. She felt like she'd get more out of her undergrad being one of a smaller number at RH than one in a huge crowd at a larger university. Her goal is academia, so she'll go to one of the big name schools for grad school when she'll be the center of attention (her phrasing).</p>

<p>Yale and Stanford have an option known as Single Choice Early Action. This requires that you not submit EA applications to other schools, but if accepted, you are not bound to take the offer. So this SCEA option is "restrictive", but no EA options are "binding".</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/college-search-selection/354075-list-colleges-early-action-early-decision-rolling-admissions.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/college-search-selection/354075-list-colleges-early-action-early-decision-rolling-admissions.html&lt;/a>
(this is a 2007 post so some schools' options may have changed)</p>

<p>Yeah MIT is my first choice so I want to apply EA there so I wouldn't do Yale or Stanford</p>

<p>Georgetown</p>

<p>Georgetown's EA is restrictive in that it won't let you do ED anywhere else.</p>