Columbia University Mountain ? Columbia University Glacier ?

<p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Columbia_(Colorado%5B/url%5D)"&gt;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Columbia_(Colorado)&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_Glacier_(Alaska%5B/url%5D)"&gt;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_Glacier_(Alaska)&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Are these real ?</p>

<p>If it's on Wikipedia, it has to be true.</p>

<p>have you seen a harvard street or a columbia street? guess what - there has always been a fascination with the ivy league and naming things after it.</p>

<p>yeah it is real.</p>

<p>People like to name stuff after their Colleges. Berkelenium?</p>

<p>While those are named after the university (you can tell because the mountains/glaciers around are named for other Ivies), there are even more things that are named after Columbia, but not the university: Columbia</a> - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</p>

<p>Yes it appears to be true
Columbia</a> University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.</p>

<p>If you scroll down to the bottom of the above wiki page on columbia university itself it mentions it.</p>

<p>They even named the nation's capital after our great school!</p>

<p>Washington</a>, D.C. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (founded in 1790, versus 1754)</p>

<p>Ugh.</p>

<p>^^however, I think we were known as King's College back then. I don't know when we became the first of many "Columbias"...</p>

<p>actually no - columbia college was renamed in 1784 after some patrioticness.</p>

<p>columbia is the feminine personification of the Americas (derived from Christopher Columbus) at first used poetically and later used to name things, the first major institution to be named columbia was alma mater in 1784.</p>