Concentrations/focus/stream in Mechanical Engineering

<p>I'm a current UIUC student. Also I'm starting junior level courses in fall. I finished sophomore year but still don't have a very good picture of my options.</p>

<p>1) Is there a need to concentrate in a particular stream in mechanical engineering (i.e. fluids or automotive or manufacturing) for undergraduates? Should I start thinking about that now? </p>

<p>2) I don't have a strong preference to any concentration in ME. What are the common options out there?</p>

<p>3) Is a cross with other disciplines, e.g. Industrial Engr or EE or CE a better option?</p>

<p>4) I assume picking my technical electives in a particular topic is better than picking over a broad range, thoughts on that?</p>

<p>Thanks!</p>

<p>It depends on you. If you want grad school you ought to specialize a bit. If you want a particular type of job, tailor your electives that direction. If you really haven't a clue, just explore your options.</p>

<p>As for options, you can broadly separate them into thermal fluid sciences, dynamics and controls, and materials. There are other small branches and subdisciplines but those would be the major ones.</p>

<p>Good luck!</p>

<p>Oskee-wow-wow!</p>

<p>Hey, thanks for the info. Any particular courses that you find are interesting technical electives? I know for sure I'd like to try a Finite Element Analysis course later.</p>

<p>I took FEA my senior year with Dr. Thomas. It was alright. It was certainly useful and companies like to see it if you end up in that area, but it wasn't really my cup of tea as far as personal interest goes.</p>

<p>I really enjoyed taking ME 412, which is viscous flow. I took it with Dr. Bodony in the AERO department and even today I still think he is one of the better professors I have had. That class is actually what convinced me to go to grad school. I also enjoyed ME 420, which I took with Dr. King, and I really liked him as a professor as well.</p>