Cornell vs. UC Berkeley

<p>I may have to chose between UC Berkeley and Cornell for undergrad engineering. To be honest, I just lloooooooveee Cornell, but just because UC Berkeley is internationally famous, I might have to go with that...</p>

<p>How famous/renown in the world is Cornell anyways?</p>

<p>I know for sure that it's very well known in China</p>

<p>berkley's engineer > cornell's engineering</p>

<p>cornell environment > berkley's environment</p>

<p>private > public</p>

<p>Our engineers are equal at the very least.</p>

<p>We have world renowned facilities and faculty members.
Even in Berkeley's best departments (Comp Sci., Electrical Eng, Chemical Eng) we can give them a run for their money any day.</p>

<p>I can promise you having an engineering degree from Cornell will not close any doors to you. And having a degree from Berkeley will not open any extras.</p>

<p>Any top 15 engineering school will leave you on equal footing.</p>

<p>How about computer science in Berkeley L&S vs computer science at Cornell CAS?</p>

<p>^^?
Cornell has a huge diverse computer science department that is internationally renowned.</p>

<p>It has faculty members who are experts in computer architecture, mechanical systems, human-computer interfaces (visual, pen/paper, etc), artificial intelligence, database systems and data mining, networks, computational complexity, mathematical modeling, machine learning, cryptography and security, etc.</p>

<p>^The same should be true of Berkeley's computer science department (and to state the obvious: Silicon Valley).</p>

<p>I was under the impression that Hotel and Engineering were Cornell's two strongest and most prestigious departments.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I was under the impression that Hotel and Engineering were Cornell's two strongest and most prestigious departments.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>And English. And architecture. And labor relations. And food science. And ecology. And physics. And human development. And chemistry. And comparative literature. And natural resources.</p>

<p>The list goes on. But you get the point.</p>

<p>And astronomy, and animal science, and viticulture, and atmospheric sciences, and east asian studies, and psychology.</p>

<p>But yeah, you get the idea.</p>

<p>You'll be fine with either one. Go with whichever you want personally-- both are well known worldwide and will serve you very well career-wise.</p>

<p>I'm interested in picking which is MOST internationally renown...like is Cornell as famous as Harvard? Or is Cornell only known in America?</p>

<p>I know for sure people in China know Berkeley well.</p>

<p>Then please go to Berkeley and save Cornell engineers from having to deal with you.</p>

<p>For your information, however, look where the president of Taiwan from 1988-2000 and Singapore's current ambassador to the US went to school.</p>

<p>Just ask any of the hundreds of international students we have yearly what our reputation in Asia is.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I'm interested in picking which is MOST internationally renown...like is Cornell as famous as Harvard? Or is Cornell only known in America?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That's a really fantastic way to a pick a school. Or not. Do us a favor and don't consider Cornell.</p>

<p>^Guys, give him a break. Internationally, places like Cornell and Berkeley might be regarded as 'better' than say Columbia or Caltech simply because people aren't really exposed to the realities of the US college scene.</p>

<p>That said, Cornell and Berkeley both have enormous (almost disproportionally so) repute overseas and I'd be hard pressed to say which is more renowned internationally. At least from my experience here in Singapore, I feel that Cornell enjoys the reputation of being an Ivy League school while in general, Berkeley is considered a good idea for engineers who might potentially benefit from SiVal.</p>

<p>Except that the OP is of singaporean origin, but goes to a California high school.</p>

<p>^Not important in this discussion. There are many reasons why an applicant might be interested in a school's international prestige. I'm only replying to those of you who'd accuse people of being narrow-minded without realizing that outside the US, the strength of a school and its repute can be two very different thing. Illustratively, few people I know can name the eight Ivy League schools. This has implications for career prospects overseas and so on.</p>

<p>Except that the layman in a foreign country being able to name your school has little implications on job prospects.</p>

<p>The fact is, hiring managers WILL know the name of schools like Cornell and Berkeley, and WILL know the strength of your programs, regardless of whether someone on the street does.
It would be ignorant for a hiring manager to go on public name recognition alone.</p>

<p>
[quote]
The fact is, hiring managers WILL know the name of schools like Cornell and Berkeley, and WILL know the strength of your programs, regardless of whether someone on the street does.
It would be ignorant for a hiring manager to go on public name recognition alone.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Oh you'll be surprised. Even in a first-world country such as Singapore, the number of colleges that employers and scholarship boards recognize is considerably limited. Sure, the awareness of strong colleges that are relatively lesser known is increasing but on the whole, an international will be ill-advised to ignore the fact that many employers do carry certain misguided perceptions about which colleges produce strong graduates.</p>

<p>And is Cornell one of those schools that employers and scholarship boards do not recognize?</p>