Do I need a job for my apps?

<p>I don't/never have had a job and I don't need one for money.</p>

<p>Should I get one to list on my college app/do admissions officers really like applicants with work experience?</p>

<p>Admissions officers like applicants who have true passions and impressive dedication.</p>

<p>They do not like applicants who go to great lengths to fake a passion.</p>

<p>Do what you like, because your interests will take you farther than your motivation to look "good" on paper.</p>

<p>That being said, if you can hold down a job for many years, that shows dedication, responsibility, maturity, and commitment. However, any other EC will be able to showcase those qualities as well, as long as you are truly interested in them.</p>

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That being said, if you can hold down a job for many years, that shows dedication, responsibility, maturity, and commitment. However, any other EC will be able to showcase those qualities as well, as long as you are truly interested in them.

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<p>Yep. </p>

<p>My personal opinion is that holding a job just to hold a job is rarely impressive. However, applicants who must work to help their family and/or who move up to positions traditionally held by adults, like some sort of manager, will be looked upon favorably. </p>

<p>If you don't need it for the money, you may be better off putting your efforts elsewhere for the purposes of college admissions. If you want money for the school year, summer jobs are great for that, as is something more casual like babysitting.</p>

<p>I'm curious: a job, or an [unpaid] internship?</p>

<p>I took a job as a tennis coach this summer (and plan to continue in the fall, and hopefully spring if it doesn't conflict with the tennis season) to earn some money, and perhaps help out with my parents' financial difficulties. </p>

<p>However, many of my friends decided to work as an intern in a laboratory or hospital. A great aspect of these internships is that they give great experience. Do colleges look at these more favorably?</p>

<p>^Depends on the circumstances.</p>

<p>Don't do it to impress the admissions officers. Do it because you want to do it. Be yourself on the application.</p>

<p>QUESTION: Does 700 hours community service in a nursing home good enough to not have a job?</p>

<p>Community service trumps having a job. Having a job is a slight plus in SOME colleges but EVERY college looks at community service.</p>

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QUESTION: Does 700 hours community service in a nursing home good enough to not have a job?

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<p>You do not need to have community service, nor it is in any way necessary to have a job. Neither of which is a requirement and the two are not in direct comparison to each other.</p>

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EVERY college looks at community service.

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<p>Many colleges in the country admit students based on transcript alone and ECs make no difference. For the super selectice colleges that take ECs into account, it's better to pursue in depth something you love so that you actually achieve something with the time than to garner up the volunteer hours for the sole purpose of college admissions out of the hope that it may actually make any difference.</p>

<p>Yeah I agree with you, HazelCapri! However, at which colleges do "ECs make no difference"? Lol even at my in-state schools ECs hold significant weight...</p>

<p>@elbeeen: Many. For instance, colleges like U of Iowa used something called Regent Admission Index (RAI), which is computed based on ACT/SAT, class rank, GPA and number of high school core courses. ECs hold minimal weight in admissions, though "personal qualities" and "talent/ability" are said to be considered.</p>

<p>every kid should have a summer job and be earning money..IMHO</p>