Does anyone know...

<p>Does anyone know if a student can apply ED to one school and EA(not SC) to another? In other words, can my D apply ED to Dartmouth and EA to BC?</p>

<p>Yes...so long as the EA school is not single choice, as you said.</p>

<p>Some high schools...and I know this from personal experience...will not permit it, however.</p>

<p>That's what I am afraid of. My D is asking her GC today and I am sure she will say no. Why won't they allow it?</p>

<p>How does a school have any right (legally or otherwise) do prohibit a perfectly allowable and aboveboard set of applications?</p>

<p>That's really outrageous; I've never heard of it before.</p>

<p>I'm not sure it is outrageous if we consider that GCs will often go to bat for their students. GCs must be able to convince a college that it is indeed the #1 choice of the applicant. If the GC knows that an applicant is applying ED and EA to two different places, it puts the GC in an awkward position.</p>

<p>This is, in my opinion, far less objectionable than GCs in private schools managing the number of applicants to specific schools with the idea of maximizing the chances of those they think should be allowed to apply there by discouraging or even prohibiting other students from applying.</p>

<p>I think Dartmouth is SCED. As in you can't apply EA anywhere else.</p>

<p>My daughter had a "first choice" school that was ED. She was also interested in an EA school that could have been viewed as a safety and allowed ED applicants to apply....and she would have been happy to attend if things didn't work out with her ED school. Her GC declared that if a student was applying ED, only one application should go out even if they were also interested in an EA school that allowed ED applicants. The GC was militant that a student should only have one "early" school. She would allow rolling admissions applications to go out because she said that an applicant was penalized by not getting their paperwork in a soon as possible. I hesitated to make a stink at the time.</p>

<p>Ultimately it worked out because my daughter got into the ED choice.....but if she had been deferred or rejected I would have been very angry that she had not been able to apply to the other school that she liked and was EA. I was pleased with the attention that the GC paid to all of her advisees but her arbitrary rule just drove me nuts.</p>

<p>"I'm not sure it is outrageous if we consider that GCs will often go to bat for their students. GCs must be able to convince a college that it is indeed the #1 choice of the applicant. If the GC knows that an applicant is applying ED and EA to two different places, it puts the GC in an awkward position."</p>

<p>It did gall me a bit to see people at other schools maneuvering as much as they could when all I wanted for my daughter was to have a good safety school in her pocket if she got rejected from her first love.</p>

<p>There also are practical reasons for not allowing this. In my S's case, his graduating class (public school) was large and the college office did not have the resources to process a large number of early applications. This same school also limits the total number of applications to 7.</p>

<p>Some of you may think this is unfair and unreasonable...as do a lot of parents in the school. In fact, however, these rules are fairly neutral.</p>

<p>Consider that the school is a feeder and its policies are well-known. Colleges know that the seniors are applying to no more than 6 other schools. They can be confident, then, that if they accept a student, there is a greater likelihood that the student will matriculate. If the HS allowed 10 applications, that likelihood would be significantly reduced.</p>

<p>And looking back on the process, I'd have to say as a parent that my S would have struggled first to expand his list and second to complete additional applications. I frankly didn't think he'd ever complete the 7. As it turned out, he was accepted early, he withdrew his other (partial) apps and we never found out.</p>

<p>My guidance counselor, and every other guidance counselor at my school, came to the consensus that it would be fine for people to apply ED somewhere and EA to Georgetown (even though Georgetown doesn't allow this). I refuse to be the whistle blower, but I am not sure whether I should jump on the band-wagon. I guess I'll have to be a good kid and stick to the rules.</p>

<p>It is a whole different story if a highschool is restricting early applications that are permissable under the rules of the colleges involved, as opposed to enforcing the rules that the colleges have for early applicants. I, too, have seen many highschools, all public schools, who have permitted multiple applications despite the fact that one or more of the colleges are single choice or have other restrictions that are being blatantly disregarded. I saw many ivy/BC combos last year when the ivies tend to be single choice in their early plans. I even called a highschool counselor on it who was very cavalier and said "everyone does this" and that there are no guidelines or penalties assessed by any governing group. They do not permit multiple ED apps as they well know that the acceptances lists for ED are circulated and multiple applicants in that can easily be caught and burned. </p>

<p>As for highschools limiting the number of application early or the number of application at all, I do have a problem with that policy. The rules clearly permit this, and in every such school I have found many exceptions to this rule, and find that the obedient families are the ones that get penalized. S's school does not like kids applying to more than one EA school, but many kids do it. Just discouraging it, does cut down on the the kids taking that route, however. When S asked for an exception for himself as he was taking the performing arts route and in some cases the class is accepted on a rolling basis, no one blinked an eye and permitted this. Another kid who is applying to some special programs was also permitted, as were some athletes. But then a regular kid who wanted to apply ED Duke, EA BC and some other catholic schools along with some rolling state schools was stopped at the gate. A pushy mom got him through, but other kids just toed the line. And this is at a school that is pretty reasonable in most of their policies. I do not think it is fair. If the colleges involved permit multiple early apps, and the kid can get the paperwork done on a timely basis, why not let him have the slight advantage of EA and get the process over by December if he so chooses? It is not as though the office inundated with apps as they are going to be in Dec and Jan when all the last minute apps come rolling in, and these days some kids are applying to a boatload of schools. With the lottery ticket chances, there are kids applying to 10 or more reach schools, a couple of matches and a safety so 15 schools is not as unusual as it used to be even as late as a few years ago. This office just writes one rec which it completes over the summer for all juniors and is just on file--it is just copied and slapped into the envelope with the transcript; they do not fill out the questionnaires for anyone. So unless a guidance office is doing in detail work on each app, I don't see the problem even in multiple apps, and any early apps will spread the workload through the year.</p>

<p>jamimom....
if our school had made those kinds of exceptions, I'd be upset too. But they don't. The only exception they make is for kids applying to multiple schools within the SUNY or CUNY systems. Since you can apply to several schools using a single app, that counts as just one of the seven permitted apps.</p>

<p>I called BC and Dartmouth yesterday and they both said that it could, in fact,be done. It was no violation to apply EA to BC and ED to Dartmouth at the same time. If D were to get in to Dartmouth early she would have to rescind her app to BC. BC is not up there on her list, but I thought it would be nice to get another app out now. Also, BC has that Presidential Scholarship for EA applicants. However, yesterday D asked GC if it could be done. GC said absolutely not.(she's a bit clueless).Anyway, I don't know how we would convince GC that it can be done. I don't know if it's worth it.</p>

<p>Also, do any of you know how to "check off" the ED box on the common app online?
Thanks</p>

<p>burlmom...if indeed your gc is clueless, you may be able to persuade her by printing out the relevant info from each school's web site or by encouraging her to call the schools as you did.</p>

<p>if it's a matter of policy, however, you may be stuck</p>

<p>Why not go over the gc's head to the principal?</p>

<p>Aren't applicants supposed to sign their applications, verifying that they are truthful? And wouldn't applying to more than one single-choice EA or ED school be violating the rules? How could someone sign off on that in all good conscience? </p>

<p>Momof2 in CA</p>

<p>The question here is applying to an ED and a non-single choice EA school. Most EAs are not SC.</p>

<p>I was referring to this post, sorry for the confusion:</p>

<p>"My guidance counselor, and every other guidance counselor at my school, came to the consensus that it would be fine for people to apply ED somewhere and EA to Georgetown (even though Georgetown doesn't allow this). I refuse to be the whistle blower, but I am not sure whether I should jump on the band-wagon. I guess I'll have to be a good kid and stick to the rules."</p>