Does your undergrad degree matter if you have a masters?

<p>I'm currently an undergradmajoring in operations research and minoring in computer science. It's slightly late for me to change my major to CS, but I was interested in getting a masters in it perhaps once I graduate with an OR degree. First of all, is this allowed, in the sense that you can apply to a masters program that's different from your undergrad major so long as you have enough background? And also, after I receive my masters and I'm applying for jobs, in the CS industry per se, would the fact that I didn't have a CS undergrad degree hinder me at all?</p>

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I'm currently an undergradmajoring in operations research and minoring in computer science. It's slightly late for me to change my major to CS, but I was interested in getting a masters in it perhaps once I graduate with an OR degree. First of all, is this allowed, in the sense that you can apply to a masters program that's different from your undergrad major so long as you have enough background?

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<p>Yes, some graduate programs allow this. You may have to fulfill the undergraduate requirements of the school in addition to fulfilling the graduate requirements, however.</p>

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And also, after I receive my masters and I'm applying for jobs, in the CS industry per se, would the fact that I didn't have a CS undergrad degree hinder me at all?

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<p>Different companies have different requirements. Generally speaking, companies are looking for people that can solve their customers' problems. Over the lifetime of one's career, being known for solutions to problems is more likely to keep someone employed.</p>

<p>Can you apply to a graduate field different than your undergraduate field? Absolutely, although you may have to take additional courses and may be less competitive than students with similar GRE/GPA who are NOT changing fields.</p>

<p>Will employers care? Not a lot. Undergraduate degrees are very wide and very shallow, and most employers (especiialy engineering employers) are really looking for specialists. Not having a CS undergrad will hinder your ability to find employment in CS outside your graduate are of research, but that is not where you would expect to find employment anyway.</p>

<p>In your field of interest, I'd say it's totally OK. I know people who went back and got Computer Science Masters degrees after majoring in fields from Architecture to Music Therapy for undergrad and they are doing fine.</p>

<p>Especially since you had the minor, you probably won't have many bridge courses.</p>

<p>Another option would be to double major and get a 2nd degree. Might add about a year or so.</p>