Double Major + Minor or Single Major + Minor

<p>I am currently a Cognitive Science/Communication double major with a minor in education studies. I want to go into the field of student affairs and/or post-secondary administration.</p>

<p>But if I continue on the double major and minor, I will be carrying at least 16 units every quarter for 5 years (I am going to be a Junior in the Fall) and I am going to be highly involved in college and campus organizations. So, should I switch to a single major and minor and not worry about grades and excel in organizations. Or just man up and do the double major and minor?</p>

<p>If single major, which major should I choose, I am little more invested in Cognitive Science; however, a Communication major sounds more applicable to the career I want.</p>

<p>Thank you for any replies.</p>

<p>are you a wizard?</p>

<p>i never thought of myself like that, except while watching harry potter movies.</p>

<p>wow i can't imagine how that's even possible. i'm planning on double majoring poli sci/econ and i was happy to graduate in four.
wouldn't all those major/minor requirements exceed the 240 unit limit?
but in response, if you're really that motivated and thrilled about all those classes, go for it.
if you decide to do a single major, just because you'd major in comm doesn't mean you could take classes in cog sci, and vice versa, so do whichever you'd prefer whether you decide based on your own personal preference or practicality.</p>

<p>ahh, thx paradise for your advice!! it gave me an idea.</p>

<p>well, i asked my college advisor about the unit limit before, she said that "ill be fine" even tho i will exceed it.</p>

<p>oops i meant *couldn't take classes of the other sort. but i think you knew that. haha.
glad to help!</p>

<p>Honestly, I don't think there's a point to have two majors and a minor. I've heard that graduate schools don't even really consider your minor. You definitely don't need all three.</p>

<p>Eeh, quick question. Can you still pick a minor after you enrolled? because I'm an incoming freshman with only a bio major and nothing else. However I do consider a minor in maybe psychology or maybe a language, but I didn't consider this until last week.</p>

<p>Eeh, quick question. Can you still pick a minor after you enrolled? because I'm an incoming freshman with only a bio major and nothing else. However I do consider a minor in maybe psychology or maybe a language, but I didn't consider this until last week.</p>

<p>You don't declare a minor until later on, don't worry. You have to fill out a form that lists the specific classes you'll be taking. you have plenty of time</p>

<p>oh really? That's good. But when exactly does that happen? Is that going to be handled by a counselor?</p>

<p>Nah, you just do it like junior or senior year, preferably when you've already taken a few classes for your minor. I am not positive but I think you have to get it signed by the department or counselor or someone. Google 'Declaring a minor at UCSD" and see what comes up :)</p>

<p>thanks, I'll go look that up now.</p>

<p>You can declare a minor whenever you want online. You just list the classes you'll use for that minor and click submit. There's no rush to do it though, especially since you probably won't know all the classes you'll be taking for it.</p>

<p>You can't even petition for a minor until 90 units, if I recall. And for most people, that's mid-end of 2nd year.</p>

<p>If you want to pursue one, check out the department website and the requirements, take the appropriate Lower Div GEs. You won't have to worry about Upper Divs until you have to fill out the paper (and make sure you keep in mind your unit limit. It's malleable, but just easier to be under it)</p>

<p>I'm doing a minor and am not planning on declaring it until I take most of my classes, so like, winter quarter senior year. :) hehe and am only doing it because I need the credits. To the initial poster, I'd say stick to a major and minor (that's what a career services center advisor told me), you'll value good grades and extracurriculars (*cough, for grad school/work resumes *cough) more than having a double major, I'd say. But that's just me.</p>

<p>I just finished a double major/double minor in 4+summer. It's possible, but make sure you have a reason to do it (in the first place). My two majors dealt directly on my research interests/experience and my two minors were mainly convenience--one only needed 4 courses to complete after factoring in my AP/IB units and the other I had already taken enough supplemental classes that I just had to petition it.</p>

<p>Regarding unit cap:</p>

<p>UCSD will kick you out before you finish IF and ONLY IF you have finished the requirements for at least one major and are en route to completing your second one. Don't finish your GEs or make sure you finish both your degrees in the same quarter and you can take as many units as you want. A friend of mine who switched from Computer Science to BioEng 3 years into school is going to have something around 300 units after all is said and done.</p>

<p>thanks for the advice everyone! :)</p>

<p>Oyama: "Regarding unit cap: UCSD will kick you out before you finish IF and ONLY IF you have finished the requirements for at least one major and are en route to completing your second one. Don't finish your GEs or make sure you finish both your degrees in the same quarter and you can take as many units as you want."</p>

<p>That's good news for me. I'm trying to work out an added double major right now (Economics, being added to a Poli Sci major I'm 3/4 of the way finished with - entering my 4th year). My unit count might be an issue when all is said and done, mostly due to the lower div math classes I have to take BEFORE I can start knocking major requirements out of the way. I'm wondering if summer sessions count against the limit of quarters that you can attend, or is that limit also a soft limit?</p>

<p>Also a soft limit. When you petition your double major and write out your intended 5 year plan, they don't care how many quarters you do it in, really. They just want to know that it's feasible and that you can handle the workload.</p>