Effective idea of convincing people

<p>We had a p-chem midterm last week and got it back today. I got a 50% and the class average was 60%. The prof said he doesn't scale or curve but rather use a rigid scheme for assigning grades (85% or above being an A). Concerned and desperate, I asked him for any alternative, and he said that if there is a general consensus on Friday, then he will offer us a makeup midterm next Monday.</p>

<p>I'm currently trying to come up with ways I can get the general consensus. So far, I thought about making and printing little slips of paper saying about this option and then going to lecture 10 minutes early to put the papers on each desk in lecture before everyone comes in. Then if a few people are for the makeup midterm, then once the prof announces about the option at the beginning, there will be a general consesus.</p>

<p>The problem is that I don't know anyone in class and many people skip lectures (the class has like 60 people and only 20 or below attend lectures). Those few who come to lectures will likely be good students, and so they are likely to have done well on the midterm. So they would object to or be neutral to a makeup midterm. So in this regard, my paper slip method isn't likely to be effective. (But what if I emphasize on the paper slide the fact that grading isn't scaled/curved so people who did well on the midterm wouldn't need to worry about the average going up due to makeup midterm and thus raising the curve)
I'd appreciate any great ideas.</p>

<p>***!?!</p>

<p>Instead of going through the trouble of convincing people to take a midterm make-up, wouldn't it be easier to just study harder/better for the next midterm?</p>

<p>Does your school use BlackBoard or anything similar? Each of my classes has a BlackBoard component, and through BlacKBoard it's possible to send out a mass email. Might be an easier way to get more people's attention. Or a FB event? </p>

<p>I wonder why he wouldn't just allow <em>you</em> to retake it, assuming he'd be game for allowing the whole class to retake it. Would it do any good to show him that you've taken the time to go through your test and make corrections (on a different sheet of paper, obviously--not suggesting that you alter your original test)? Perhaps he'd give you points back. </p>

<p>If the average of your class was a 60, it seems like a large portion probably scored in the 50s or 60s--nowhere near the cutoff for an A. So I bet a lot of people would want to do a retake, if possible.</p>

<p>How many entrances are there to the lecture room? Maybe you could make a huge fluorescent poster board that says something like "WANNA RETAKE THAT &$^%-ING MIDTERM? RAISE YOUR HAND WHEN HE ASKS!" and stand outside the room while people are filtering in. Then you could explain the option to those who ask you, and you'll create enough of a scene that people will be curious and stop to see what's up. If there are multiple entrances which aren't near each other, you could enlist a friend to stand at the other door. </p>

<p>Just my first thought. If I come up with more I'll let you know!</p>

<p>
[quote]
Instead of going through the trouble of convincing people to take a midterm make-up, wouldn't it be easier to just study harder/better for the next midterm?

[/quote]
The course has only one midterm and one final.</p>

<p>Thanks for your wonderful ideas, kristin5792.

[quote]
Does your school use BlackBoard or anything similar? Each of my classes has a BlackBoard component, and through BlacKBoard it's possible to send out a mass email. Might be an easier way to get more people's attention. Or a FB event?

[/quote]
No, unfortunately.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If the average of your class was a 60, it seems like a large portion probably scored in the 50s or 60s--nowhere near the cutoff for an A. So I bet a lot of people would want to do a retake, if possible.

[/quote]
Nice point, but I previously said,
"...many people skip lectures (the class has like 60 people and only 20 or below attend lectures). Those few who come to lectures will likely be good students, and so they are likely to have done well on the midterm. So they would object to or be neutral to a makeup midterm. So in this regard, my paper slip method isn't likely to be effective. (But what if I emphasize on the paper slide the fact that grading isn't scaled/curved so people who did well on the midterm wouldn't need to worry about the average going up due to makeup midterm and thus raising the curve)."</p>

<p>
[quote]
How many entrances are there to the lecture room? Maybe you could make a huge fluorescent poster board that says something like "WANNA RETAKE THAT &$^%-ING MIDTERM? RAISE YOUR HAND WHEN HE ASKS!" and stand outside the room while people are filtering in. Then you could explain the option to those who ask you, and you'll create enough of a scene that people will be curious and stop to see what's up. If there are multiple entrances which aren't near each other, you could enlist a friend to stand at the other door.

[/quote]
That's a bit too showy(?) for me. Why not the paper slid method?</p>

<p>You're asking for suggestions and you're getting them, but you're complaining? Even if it is showy, I know if I got a 50 on an exam that I would do anything and EVERYthing I could to amend the problem - even if that means looking a fool. You cared enough about your grade to ask your professor to provide leniency, then cared more to request suggestions on CC, why not go all the way? You have nothing to lose but you would be a fool to not act just because you feel uncomfortable. Why not the slip method? - Why not both and any other ideas that you run upon.</p>

<p>The only way I know to improve your chances for good grade on any exam is to study hard and smart, and do not hesitate to seek help even when you think you understand but not sure 100%. Got to be sure 100% about all concepts in class BEFORE exam. 60% average is none of your concern, your goal is to have an "A" in every class and forget about your "pride" and "image" seeking help. If you spend considerable time trying on your own but still not sure if you got it correctly, ask. Many classes in pre-med's schedule have 60% average, you cannot continue with your approach, you will need to take MCAT after all, material in all classes have to be in your head for that, 50% understanding will not do you any good. I am not trying to be harsh, I am trying to state reality of situation.</p>

<p>60% average with 85% being A sounds about right. Premed courses are curved and if your professor honestly had issues with the average he would have curved the test up to the average he wanted. Most likely he designed the test to have an average around 60. If you're taking pchem then you must have gone through gen chem and orgo? Were these classes not graded on a curve at your school?</p>

<p>One word: inception.</p>

<p>This reminds me of something that happened to DS in his second semester physics class. The second mid-term is very difficult (as measured by the class average) but DS did relatively well on it. The professor, noticing that many students were very discouraged, decided to lower the weight of this mid-term and raised the weight of the final. The final turns out to be much easier. If DS got one point less in his final, he would get A- instead of A. If the professor kept the original policy, he would get a much better "deal" (i.e., his safe margin is greater). It worked out in the end so he did not have a complaint. He is OK with this change because the change is good for most of his premed friends but would not hurt him.</p>

<p>Any change like this is somewhat like a change in public policy: some will gain something but some may lose something. It is difficult to say which way is fairer. There is no perfect solution for everybody. At fault may be the professor who gave out a test that is "too difficult"</p>