Electrical engineering???

<p>I want to be an electrical engineer when i grow up. I live in california and electrical engineering is big here. I was wondering what i should do for my B.S. and my MSE. i want to take engineering in both categories. should i take EE for both my B.S. and my M.S., or should i do a different batchelors then a masters so i dont "bog myself down" in one isolated field??? I am interested in EE, Chemical Engineering, BME, and a little bit in mechanical engineering. </p>

<p>what do you think i should take for my major and my masters????</p>

<p>I am also thinking about after my masters, taking an MBA or a MEM degree and later becoming an engineer manager, or in the upper ranks of a company as an EE, that would be my ideal plan.</p>

<p>when do you think i should take those courses???</p>

<p>is it also better to do electrical engineering as B.S. or a M.S.???
because if i were to take it as a B.S., would it be better to masters in E.E. or BME</p>

<p>If you want to be an electrical engineer, get your BS in EE - that is the only way to get the full breadth of the field, taking your BS in any other area will limit you to a couple of specific specialties of EE. The same applies to the other fields - if you change your mind are more interested in ChemE, then major in that instead. If you cannot make up your mind, then pick one and take some extra coursework in the other field - if you reach the end of your bachelors and decide you made the wrong decision, those extra courses will help you switch for your masters.</p>

<p>As far as a masters degree, you won't really know what you should take until you are nearly done with your bachelors - there are just too many variables for me to make a suggestion. As before, if you want to be an EE, an MSEE would generally be the best choice, but you may also (or instead) want a masters in math, or physics, or may want to switch fields entirely.</p>

<p>As far as management degrees, you want at least a few years of experience before going after one of these degrees - a management degree without experience is a hindrance, not an asset. At my company, you realistically need about 7-8 years of experience (including time spent getting advanced degrees) before you can be considered for management, although there are a few routes around that. Still, get at least to the level of "competent engineer" before you start looking for management. Also, realize that these degrees are only required for actual management positions - I work alongside some of the highest-level engineers in my massive company, and none of them have management degrees, but a heck of a lot of them have PhD's and ALL of them have masters.</p>

<p>"""As far as management degrees, you want at least a few years of experience before going after one of these degrees - a management degree without experience is a hindrance, not an asset. At my company, you realistically need about 7-8 years of experience (including time spent getting advanced degrees) before you can be considered for management, although there are a few routes around that. Still, get at least to the level of "competent engineer" before you start looking for management. Also, realize that these degrees are only required for actual management positions - I work alongside some of the highest-level engineers in my massive company, and none of them have management degrees, but a heck of a lot of them have PhD's and ALL of them have masters."""</p>

<p>I am looking at colleges and i could get into many good schools if i want but i am thinking about Santa Clara University "even though i could do a bit better" because around that area they have alot of electrical engineering companies. so i was thinking about during my undergrad getting an internship at one of those companies to see how it all works, because i heard alot of it is about the internships and experience, not entirely where you graduate. do you aggree???</p>

<p>bunpppppppp</p>

<p>I'm going into an electrical engineering program myself. I've done my due diligence in the past and decided to go with a BS in EE because it opens the door to career paths. It's my understanding that at the BS level, you hone in on your particular interest and puruse that in your masters program. Usually, BS level study is considerably broad which is a good thing because you get exposed to many different fields of study, allowing you to see what you are most passionate about.</p>