Engineering degrees

<p>I've been looking around, and to be very honest, I am extremely confused as to what graduate studies are needed for in engineering and even more so because of the different types of degrees available. So, I was hoping maybe some answers could be posted here and then combined into a compendium that explains the difference between a BS and a ME, what each one is good for, and all other associated stuff. And that includes all the sorts of different interdisciplinary degrees, and programs like Columbia's 3-2, 4-1 programs where you end up with a BS and an AS.</p>

<p>Well for starters, a BS is an undergraduate (bachelors) degree and an ME is a graduate (masters) degree. There is a lot more to it than that, but may I suggest Google?</p>

<p>boneh3ad, do you think I would have made this thread if all this information was easily found though Google? I made this thread because it isn't, and I think it would be extremely helpful to have it all in one place. And I'm aware what the BS and the ME degrees are, what I meant was more of an idea of what careers they are needed for, etc, to help people figure out if they want to need to go through grad school.</p>

<p>No need for Google, just a search on this website will do:</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/engineering-majors/726641-bs-engineering-opposed-bse.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/engineering-majors/726641-bs-engineering-opposed-bse.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/graduate-school/756269-difference-between-master-engineering-master-science-engineering.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/graduate-school/756269-difference-between-master-engineering-master-science-engineering.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>For more info on interdisciplinary engineering:</p>

<p>Engineering</a> Science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</p>