Error in Essay, really upset

<p>In my Bryn Mawr ED essay, I accidentally wrote, "I realized a women’s college did fail to provide an opportunity; instead it provided millions more." I meant to say "did not fail." Am I instantly rejected? Will they notice? I'm so upset and I don't know what to do please help</p>

<p>I had a typo or two, also. We're human, that by itself should not hurt your chances at Bryn Mawr.</p>

<p>I know that's of little comfort, but it really does not matter much at all. Now, if you had many of those it would matter.</p>

<p>:)</p>

<p>Would it help if I sent in an e-mail with the corrected essay? Isn't it too big of a mistake not to matter? I basically tell them I don't want to go to their school. I'm so upset.</p>

<p>You proofread it and missed it. You probably had a few other people proofread it---and they missed it too.</p>

<p>Chances are quite good that the admissions people reading that essay will miss it too. It's the kind of phrasing that makes our mind assume that the "not" is there---even when it isn't. From the one sentence you gave here, we can tell that it was a well-written essay.</p>

<p>Relax...</p>

<p>yes i agree. and they KNOW you wouldn't put "failed" instead of "did not fail". Why would someone write that in an admissions essay? so of course, its ok. </p>

<p>but if you wish to contact them, i don't see harm in doing it.</p>

<p>If it would make you feel better, re-send the essay; if it is on a separate sheet of paper a secretary in the admissions office can replace the old one with the new one. You might even re-send the whole application--after all, it is way before even the ED deadline and the applications are not yet being reviewed and no one is likely to have look at it yet; it is probabyl just sitting in a file, so you have time to make the correction.</p>