Failure rate for AP exams is on the rise

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<p>Failure</a> rate for AP tests climbing - USATODAY.com</p>

<p>What a shock....not....since there are soooo many places now where just anyone can simply waltz into AP courses....</p>

<p>perfect reason why AP scores should count in admissions for top schools....</p>

<p>Not on CC it isn't</p>

<p>That's because CC represents a highly motivated and dedicated portion of the American student population, and this site allows us to share techniques, strategies and resources on how to succeed.</p>

<p>At my school the pass rate is climbing. Teachers are for some reason feeling obligated to teach students well. The average AP Euro score went from 2.23 to a 3.9. Pretty good.</p>

<p>^^ I second that.</p>

<p>These days, people are trying to take 8 AP tests in 2 weeks. These are college-level tests, and college students take about 3 or 4 finals in one time period. So 5+ tests at once is a huge workload, even for college students. </p>

<p>You can only devote so much time to studying for each test. If a student takes many tests and does poorly on all of them, he or she floods the system with a large number of bad scores. Because there are so many low scores, the average score is brought down. So a small handful of people will bring down the average AP scores by a lot.</p>

<p>It isn't about teachers or if its easy or not to get into an ap class. The ultimate success tool is if the student is motivated or not to take and pass the exam. Lots of kids these days think they can just wing the exam and well it ends up blowing up in their faces. Don't take any short cuts guys. Sit down, read the books, do the simulation exams, write practice essays. Stop looking for shortcuts. The article points to unprepared teachers to blame but it isn't the teachers, its the teaching methods. We are still teaching ap classes as if we were in the stone age. Read the book, take multiple choice tests etc. The real solution comes with technology. There are websites out there that can pretty much simulate the entire ap exam for you, yet teachers are oblivious to these resources.</p>

<p>Its no surprise that many students are opting to self-study the exams. I don't blame them. Its much easier to self-study then take the class and be forced to do much extra work that doesn't help you for the exam.</p>

<p>Killer is right. For example, in my World History AP class, only me and my friend out of 30 something people in our class (not counting the other period) actually read the textbook. Of course, we're the only ones with a high A, while most people have high B and lower. Apart from a select few, most aren't read for the AP test.</p>

<p>I don't want to sound pretentious but some students (like 4-7 people) shouldn't even be there. They just do it because "it looks good" in college apps.</p>

<p>Killer is not right. Technology that simulates AP exams will not make the answers come to the student's more readily. It's all knowing the facts. If you can get a teacher who makes remembering the facts easier becasue the class is more interesting, then you will most likely do better. My teacher stepped up her game and made tests really really hard so that you had to study exceptionally hard to do well meaning that you knew a lot of information come May. Teaching has everything to do with it.</p>

<p>at my school, people are just too lazy or unmotivated to study for the ap exams.</p>

<p>I agree with TheJuanSoto: people who take ap classes just to make it look good in college apps do not deserve to be in those classes. In my APWH and AP Chem, many people took those classes for college. However, that goal blew up in their face when the challenge and hw were too rigorous. As a result, they cheated. </p>

<p>Self-study is good, but I rather take the class since the pressure, test, and extra work helped me remember the information easily and sometimes class helped me understand some concepts that I do not understand.</p>

<p>^That always bothers me so much. There's no point in going through 9 months of hard work if you're not going to get college credit for it. Study hard for the AP exam, and you won't need to study for the class in college. I've seen too many smart people stop caring and get 1s and 2s, even though they could've gotten 5s.</p>

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What a shock....not....since there are soooo many places now where just anyone can simply waltz into AP courses....

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<p>The fact that the issue may not be a shock doesn't make it trivial</p>

<p>That doesn't happen at my school, but that's cause half of the people in the AP classes don't even take the tests! XD</p>

<p>That being said, I think those who do take the tests try and find an easy way out as a few others have said, just trusting their class to have prepared them all by itself, and it doesn't always do that. Teachers need to stress as much as possible that studying on your own for these tests is a student's best resource and give them resources to do so as well.</p>

<p>I think that the teacher does have a lot to do with it, but in the end, the student is the one actually taking the test. I can think of a few people in my APUSH class that shouldn't be in there - they're not unintelligent, but they're only taking the class in hopes that colleges will look favorably upon it (despite the fact that they're not doing too well), and blow off the test simply because they know they can "hide" it from colleges.</p>

<p>I completely agree that the teacher has a lot to do with pass rates. With 4 APs this year, I have been able to compare the teacher with their past pass rates (some teachers brag about it, others just let us figure it out). While it's true that it is the student taking the test, the teacher is the one that prepares the student and motivates the student to work hard at learning and doing well. I've realized that it isn't a mere coincidence that my Calculus teacher (who is an AWESOME teacher) got about an 80% pass rate last year while my Euro teacher (who doesn't teach) has about a 15% rate.</p>

<p>One of the major reasons is probably because schools are allowing unqualified students into these AP classes and the majority of students are only taking AP Classes to boost their averages up. Well, this is the way I see it in my school, a lot of my friends take AP classes and get answers to the class tests and end up getting 95 or 98 averages.</p>

<p>There is a law - in Florida at least - that says that a school can require students to get permission to get into an Honors course, but nobody can deny the student from signing up for an AP class. Considering how the state pays for all AP exams in Florida, it's no wonder that anybody can take it and fail.</p>

<p>ap scores don't count???</p>

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One of the major reasons is probably because schools are allowing unqualified students into these AP classes and the majority of students are only taking AP Classes to boost their averages up. Well, this is the way I see it in my school, a lot of my friends take AP classes and get answers to the class tests and end up getting 95 or 98 averages.

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Yeah, that's definitely a major contributing factor. At my school, not only is any slacker student is allowed to enter an AP class, but everybody is pushed into them. Why? Well, if you pass your AP exam, the teacher gets a bonus; if you pass the class but fail the exam, there isn't a single mere deduction in the school's rating/grade. So to schools, there is nothing to lose in pushing everybody into an AP course.</p>