Fluent in Language

<p>Would college admissions consider a person fluent in a language after 5 years jr/high schoollanguage courses? Vocabulary is still growing, but I feel I can carry on a conversation.</p>

<p>ummm...probably not.</p>

<p>I had four years of french including AP, came to Montreal and could barely speak/carry on an actual real-life situation, despite the fact that I would have said I was really good in french had you asked me in high school.</p>

<p>However it totally depends on you. When you watch media/listen to radio in your language (out of curiousity, what language?), can you understand what they're saying? not just what's going, not a word here or there, but actually understand? Can you talk with native speakers about various topics fluenty? That only you can answer.</p>

<p>how can you not be fluent after AP french? im only in AP french now and i can watch TV and listen to radio and get like 85%. </p>

<p>i think a good benchmark of whether or not you are fluent is if believe you could learn US History or Calculus at a French public school without too much difficulty. And obviously you should be reading newspapers in the language with no problem.</p>

<p>Wow guys that's a longtime. I spent 3 months in France at a french public school and I learned french fluently. I studied all my subjects in french and just now my junior year in highschool i left the french system which included calculus , us history and everything else in french. Now im finally doing american work at a community college though. Im not french either. You should definately spend 3 months in France and you can speak fluently, if not listen to skyrock.com or nrj.com.</p>

<p>The difficulty lies here in the application question - Are you fluent in another language? Then, it only allows you to highlight the selected langauge, without explanation. I'm in Hrs French 5 and can converse fairly well, so I'd say yes. BTW - the French in Montreal is different than in Paris which may have been your problem.</p>

<p>the french in Montreal is not that different. Ive been to Canada and was able to converse fairly well. Last year at my french school in Chicago, we had a Canadian there who conversed well and showed us how they said things in Canada, it was different but we understood.</p>

<p>i think everyone's case is different when learning a new language.......i'm a strong visual learner so i seem to never be able to learn a different language.</p>

<p>audio learners have it way easier......i know this because some people i know who can memorize those new songs after it gets played 3 times in the radio, know how to speak spanish pretty fluently.</p>

<p>audio learners? I think the best way to learn is by immersion. I went to the french school in Paris (La Defense), was places into a class with french students given french work and thats how I learned French and 7 other languages.</p>

<p>I would say that I'm fairly fluent now after living here two months...a lot of it was the accent.</p>

<p>I go by the "if you could learn another school subject in that language, you're fluent" rule :) if you can do that you're set..and I would mark fluent :)</p>

<p>nosx a dit: audio learners? I think the best way to learn is by immersion. I went to the french school in Paris (La Defense), was places into a class with french students given french work and thats how I learned French and 7 other languages
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7 other languages????? wow, that is awesome.</p>