Fulbrights Again!

<p>14 of them, plus a French teaching "Fulbright" (it's a Fulbright paid by the French rather than U.S. government), plus two finalists. More than Pomona, Swarthmore, Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, etc. Of the 15, 12 are research Fulbrights, more than Pomona, Amherst, Williams,...you get the picture.</p>

<p>90 over the past six years. More than....</p>

<p>Hi, Mini, that's fabulous news! I remember that Smith keeps topping the LACs receiving Fulbrights year after year and I found the listing online last year, but, for the life of me, I've searched all over the website and I can't seem to find it this time. I'd love to see the list. Could you please provide the link for us? Thanks. My understanding is also that it's more difficult to receive research scholarships than teaching scholarships, so that the preponderance of Smith Fulbrights being in research is awesome.</p>

<p>Well, it sort of changes. It used to be that no one applied for teaching Fulbrights so Smith started to encourage all of their students to do that, or a lot of them to do that, and they were winning all of these Fulbrights so the other colleges caught on. Then Smith swung it the other way, "Well, everyone is applying for teaching fellowships now, so we should encourage our applicants to do research fellowships" etc. It swings a little back and forth as trends change. Getting Fulbrights is as much a sign of instutional committment and understanding of the application strategy as it is of student quality, you need both to succeed. </p>

<p>Research Fulbrights are sort of the more "quality" Fulbrights if you will however, because you have to come up with an original idea that's relevant, realistic, and interesting to you, AND meets the rules (both formal rules and informal rules) of the Fulbright office. It's harder to do, because the application is more difficult, it requires you to make contact with researchers already working in that field in your country of choice that will sponsor you, clearances, etc. It's quite complicated. </p>

<p>Also, while Smith may bill it as a Fulbright, the French teaching fellowship isn't really a Fulbright. But it's still cool.</p>

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More than Pomona

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<p>So as not to offend our friends on the left coast, Pomona was awarded one more Fulbright than Smith. </p>

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I'd love to see the list.

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<p>Adjusting for Fulbrights awarded as percentage of class yields some interesting results.</p>

<p>Top</a> U.S. Producers of Fulbright Students, by Type of Institutions, 2009-10 - International - The Chronicle of Higher Education</p>

<p>Well, that's not what Pomona says:</p>

<p>Fulbrights</a> for Eleven Pomona Students | The Student Life</p>

<p>You also get "interesting adjustments" if you include only those students who attended for four years (hence eliminating all ADAs - virtually none of whom have ever gotten a Fulbright, and transfer students, who weren't prepared by Smith from day one. </p>

<p>To me, the research Fulbrights are the most telling number, especially as those are more open competitions including graduate students.</p>

<p>Of the 11 Pomona Fulbrights, four were for research. (I believe the number at Smith is 11 or 12, but I'd have to go look,)</p>