Gardasil for boys?

<p>While my son was at the doctor's today getting his college check-up I happened to pick up a pamphlet on Gardasil. Was I surprised to see it had been approved for boys and protected greatly against genital warts. Has anyone gotten this series for their sons?</p>

<p>If you do get the shots, don't tell him ahead of time that they really hurt.</p>

<p>Good advice; most shots are not painful at all so your son will probably not be aware that this one shot will sting a bit.</p>

<p>What is all this invention of Gardasil about? I have seen pictures of young girls and boys too in ads for Gardasil. Is this a ticket for having sex. Please educate me about this new invention!</p>

<p>Is this a money maker for someone?</p>

<p>I saw an ad for this for boys and asked our pediatrician about it when my 14 year old went for his physical last week. She said that the American Academy of Pediatrics had not yet recommended it for boys and although she thinks it likely will, they are waiting for the AAP recommendation before giving it to their patients.</p>

<p>Gardasil protects against 4 of the most common strains of HPV that lead to cervical cancer in women. Males usually are asymptomatic carriers of HPV (although occasionally they can develop genital warts from it) and pass it on to their female partners.</p>

<p>It's not exactly a free ticket for having sex. The vaccine was developed and tested on pediatric populations (and up to age 26) because people under 25-30 typically have a much better immune response to vaccines, and those that are already sexually active may have already been exposed to one or more of the four HPV strains.</p>

<p>My husband (who studies cancer) has a bee in his bonnet about Gardasil and was adamant that our boys need to get the shot. He works with a bunch of head and neck cancer researchers and apparently cancer rates have shot up as oral sex has gotten popular. All those doctors are telling him this is the best prevention for many of these cancers. </p>

<p>There was much discussion at the doctor's office because it's not yet on the recommended list, but I assured the doctor we'd pay for it if the insurance didn't cover it.</p>

<p>I too asked my son's doctor about it a couple of weeks ago, when we went in to be sure he was up to date in all the other vaccinations he had to have documented for his college. She said that it's a fairly new CDC recommendation that boys be vaccinated for HPV, and that she personally has never seen a case of boys having any strain of HPV in her 15+ years of young adult practice. Her recommendation was to wait a year and see how the vaccine was tolerated and see if the CDC directive remained in place.</p>

<p>Son just had the first shot in the series and had no complaints. The pediatrician agreed with my suggestion to him that it was advisable.</p>

<p>In my legal work, I have encountered several cases involving men disfigured and suffering greatly from genital warts, including some that developed into penile cancer. Even if the odds are low, the cases were so appalling that I wanted Son protected.</p>

<p>Three years ago when I was at my high school reunion, one of our classmates was asked about this, as she is an OB-GYN at a major medical center. She said she tried every which way she could to get her son enrolled in the trial, but because he was under age, they would not let him get it. She said as soon as it became available for boys, she would have him get it. She is about 99% sure he is not sexually active, and will not use this shot as a reason to become promiscuous. </p>

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most shots are not painful at all so your son will probably not be aware that this one shot will sting a bit.

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<p>Yea, I know dozens of girls who would disagree with this vehemently! It is known as the most painful vaccination out there, although they were working on a new serum that wouldn't be so painful (it may be out by now).</p>

<p>btw - D2 had a friend who got HPV and it pretty much messed up her life while she was in high school. When the vaccination became available, she pleaded with D to get it whether she was sexually active or not.</p>

<p>I think the reason it is advised for young teens is because it is needed before exposure.</p>

<p>My son had very little reaction from round 1 of the Gardasil. (He was more bothered by the spot in his arm where they'd removed blood.) I've had Yellow Fever and Typhoid vaccines and know all about vaccinations that make you really sick. The last Yellow Fever vaccination I had, I couldn't lift my arm to brush my hair and I ran a fever so bad the room was spinning.</p>

<p>Hi, I am new to this group. I am a parent of college age sons...My background is in women's health education. I have been actively involved with a group of international parents whose daughters have been adversely affected or have died because of the HPV vaccines. To date the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) has 18,445 adverse events and 75 deaths - mostly from Gardasil. It is estimated that only 1 to 10% of the population is reporting. Reports of injuries are also starting to come in from boys. </p>

<p>Injuries include paralysis, seizures, blindness, GBS, MS, autoimmune disorders, tingling in extremities, heart problems, hair loss - too many to mention here. Many of the college age girls have had to drop out of school and some are still home bound while their peers have graduated and married. The reports are similar all around the world. </p>

<p>For more information go to Gardasil</a> Vaccine the Truth | The Truth About Gardasil | HPV Prevention with Gardasil | Gardasil Vaccine Side Effects | Gardasil Warning | Gardasil Dangers | Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant | Sick from</p>

<p>I wouldn't let either of my kids (male and female) get this vaccine. There are too many questions - safety, efficacy, duration, ingredients, post-infection vaccination, etc. No one really knows whether it will protect against a cancer that can take 20-30 years to develop, when the trials only lasted a few years.</p>

<p>There is plenty of data on the internet about Gardasil, much of it alarmist, but much of it is thought-provoking, for example The</a> Tragic Truth behind the Gardasil Nightmare .</p>

<p>Do your own research and don't let your doctor make the decision for you, they are not always as well informed as you think.</p>

<p>^^Because those links don't sound biased. GBS is a risk for all vaccinations. All vaccines carry a small degree of risk. How many people die of cervical cancer? How many people have huge hardships due to cervical cancer and genital warts? It is worth assessing the risk. IMO, the risk of vaccine is very small compared to the risk of contracting the disease (and I am in one of the populations particularly at risk for having adverse reactions).</p>

<p>I never got it when it came out, and refuse to. It hasn't been out for very long neither, thus they do not know the long term effects unlike say the meningecacol vaccine (sp).</p>

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I have been actively involved with a group of international parents whose daughters have been adversely affected or have died because of the HPV vaccines.

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<p>This information is from an article by the CDC: </p>

<p>"All serious reports (6%) for Gardasil have been carefully analyzed by medical experts. Experts have not found a common medical pattern to the reports of serious adverse events reported for Gardasil that would suggest that they were caused by the vaccine.</p>

<p>As of December 31, 2008, there have been 32 U.S. reports of death among females who have received the vaccine. There was no common pattern to the deaths that would suggest that they were caused by the vaccine."</p>

<p>From About</a> the VAERS Program :</p>

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VAERS seeks reports of any clinically significant medical event that occurs after vaccination, even if the reporter cannot be certain that the event was caused by the vaccine.

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VAERS receives reports of many events that occur after immunization. Some of these events may occur coincidentally following vaccination, while others may truly be caused by vaccination.

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<p>What this means is that if a 65-year-old alcoholic with untreated heart disease, diabetes, COPD, and high blood pressure gets the flu shot and then drops dead of a heart attack 6 hours later, technically that heart attack is an "adverse event" that could be reported. Does this mean that the flu shot must cause heart attacks? Certainly not.</p>

<p>mathmom, I would not be surprised if there will be more and more scientific data coming out in the nearest future pointing to viruses as the causes of many human diseases previously thought to be the result of unknown environmental and genetic factors.</p>