Georgetown and Northwestern

<p>I heard that 62% of cross admits between Georgetown and Northwestern choose Georgetown. Why? Please compare the two schools.</p>

<p>These are both great, great colleges that can offer superb undergraduate educations and experiences. Here are a bunch of data points that might be of some help to you as you evaluate the two:</p>

<p>O B J E C T I V E D A T A </p>

<p>UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT<br>
Northwestern 8153 Georgetown 6853</p>

<p>% AND # OF STUDENTS WHO ARE IN-STATE<br>
Northwestern 23%, 1875 Georgetown 1% (69)</p>

<p>% OF FEMALE STUDENTS<br>
Northwestern 53% Georgetown 55%</p>

<p>% OF WHITE/NON-HISPANIC STUDENTS<br>
Northwestern 59% Georgetown 65%</p>

<p>% FROM PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS<br>
Northwestern 73% Georgetown 51%</p>

<p>% OF STUDENTS IN GREEK LIFE (Male & Female)<br>
Northwestern 32%/38% Georgetown No/No</p>

<p>TOP MAJORS AT EACH SCHOOL (acc to collegeboard.com)<br>
Northwestern 20% Social Sciences, 18% Journalism & Communications, 14% Engineering, 10% Performing Arts, 9% Psychology, 6% History, 5% Biology<br>
Georgetown 31% Social Sciences, 26% Business & Marketing, 8% English, 7% Foreign Language, 6% Health Professions, 5% Psychology</p>

<p>IS & OOS COST (Tuition & Fees)<br>
Northwestern $35,429 Georgetown $35,964
Northwestern $35,529 Georgetown $35,964 </p>

<p>TOTAL COLLEGE ENDOWMENT AND PER CAPITA (undergrad and grad)<br>
Northwestern $5.14bn, $302,322 Georgetown $834mm ($73,569)</p>

<p>AVERAGE HIGH/LOW IN FEBRUARY<br>
Northwestern 35-18 Georgetown 53-30</p>

<p>GRADUATION RATES<br>
-% OF STUDENTS EXPECTED TO GRADUATE IN 6 YEARS:<br>
Northwestern 93% Georgetown 90%
-% OF STUDENTS WHO DO GRADUATE IN 6 YEARS:<br>
Northwestern 93% Georgetown 94%
-% OF STUDENTS WHO GRADUATE IN 4 YEARS:<br>
Northwestern 85% Georgetown 88%
FRESHMAN RETENTION RATE<br>
Northwestern 97% Georgetown 97%
USNWR GRADUATION & RETENTION RANK:<br>
Northwestern 13th Georgetown 9th </p>

<p>FACULTY RESOURCES<br>
-% OF CLASSES WITH <20 STUDENTS<br>
Northwestern 74% Georgetown 58%
-% OF CLASSES WITH 50+ STUDENTS<br>
Northwestern 8% Georgetown 7%
-FACULTY/STUDENT RATIO<br>
Northwestern 7/1 Georgetown 11/1
USNWR FACULTY RESOURCES RANK<br>
Northwestern 7th Georgetown 38th</p>

<p>STUDENT SELECTIVITY<br>
-% ACCEPTANCE RATE<br>
Northwestern 30% Georgetown 22%
-SAT/ACT RANGE (Middle 50%)<br>
Northwestern 1320-1500 Georgetown 1290-1490
-% OF STUDENTS RANKING IN TOP 10% IN HS CLASS<br>
Northwestern 83% Georgetown 84%
% OF STUDENTS WITH HS GPA > 3.75 (Unweighted)<br>
Northwestern na Georgetown na</p>

<h1>OF NMS FINALISTS IN 2005 (% of student body)</h1>

<pre><code>Northwestern 178 (8.87%) Georgetown 48 (2.86%)
</code></pre>

<h1>OF 1500 STUDENTS ENROLLED (% of student body)</h1>

<pre><code>Northwestern 1998 (25%) Georgetown 1478 (22%)
</code></pre>

<p>USNWR SELECTIVITY RANK<br>
Northwestern 19th Georgetown 19th</p>

<p>USNWR FINANCIAL RESOURCES RANK<br>
Northwestern 12th Georgetown 35th</p>

<p>ALUMNI GIVING %<br>
Northwestern 29% Georgetown 31%
USNWR ALUMNI GIVING RANK<br>
Northwestern 27th Georgetown 23rd</p>

<p>S U B J E C T I V E D A T A </p>

<p>PEER ASSESSMENT<br>
Northwestern 4.3 Georgetown 4</p>

<p>bump...........</p>

<p>The DC location, is amazing!!!</p>

<p>I've heard that that there is the "pre-professional" feel at both schools.</p>

<p>bump........</p>

<p>
[quote]
I heard that 62% of cross admits between Georgetown and Northwestern choose Georgetown. Why?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>it's actually likely closer to about 58% and it is because of the effect of religious association on student matriculation decisions</p>

<p>"self-selection causes a problem when certain schools are much more taste-intensive than others. Any specialty school could fall into this category, with engineering schools, strongly religious schools... being the most likely"</p>

<p>SSRN-A</a> Revealed Preference Ranking of U.S. Colleges and Universities by Christopher Avery, Mark Glickman, Caroline Hoxby, Andrew Metrick</p>

<p>so the simple answer is: students applying to georgetown have an inherent preference to attend a religious institution, a factor that aggregately becomes more important in their matriculation decision than northwestern's marginal academic superiority.</p>

<p>
[quote]
so the simple answer is: students applying to georgetown have an inherent preference to attend a religious institution, a factor that aggregately becomes more important in their matriculation decision than northwestern's marginal academic superiority.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>If it weren't for the fact that I want to major in engineering, a major not offered by Georgetown, that would probably be the deciding factor if forced to choose between these two schools. For many students, there is just something more comfortable about a religious school, likely because they have been brought up in a religious environment to some extent or another.</p>

<p>Yeah, that's why the Georgetown student body is approximately 11 to 15% Jewish.
The ignorance on this board is sometimes amazing.</p>

<p>Georgetown is not your typical Catholic school, by any means. It is inclusive and ecumenical without sacrificing its Jesuit heritage and values.</p>

<p>I'm a Catholic...but I think that Northwestern would be better match...</p>

<p>Sorry...Wildcat here.</p>

<p>Especially if you like movies-Northwestern is the school of Ann Margaret, Chuck Heston and Patricia Neal among others.</p>

<p>Georgetown has a Jesuit history, but it is not a religiously based college, curriculum and environment. It is a very welcoming environment for students of all religions and the numbers of students of different faiths currently on that campus back that up. </p>

<p>Re the Revealed Preference study, be careful to interpret that too finely. First, it's a few years old and matriculation patterns can vary from year to year and this volatility is magnified once you get beyond the great yield winners of HYPSM. Second, the study group had a large number of students from NE prep schools who are more likely to be familiar with a college like Georgetown than one in the Midwest. Third, others' preference is really irrelevant-the key is to decide which you like best. Both are terrific schools and regularly produce very satisfied and high achieving graduates.</p>

<p>Northwestern has a long affiliation with the Episcopal Church, and to this day there is an Episcopalian Theological Seminary on campus. Georgetown, as everyone knows, is a Catholic institution and has members of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) teaching and living on campus. </p>

<p>When I was looking at colleges 30 years ago, religious identities were still strong in the minds of our parents. Today, at both schools, there is much less emphasis on one religion and much more openness and commitment to interfaith education. You don't have to fear having some mandated religion pushed at you, but if you do attend one of these schools, you'll realize that some of their policies and attributes do come from a long association with a certain church. That isn't necessarily a bad thing!</p>

<p>As far as cross-admits, I would think that many students from the east would prefer Georgetown's location and weather, while many from the Chicago area think Northwestern is too close to home.</p>

<p>Midwesterner:</p>

<ol>
<li><p>Northwestern has absolutely no religious affiliation.</p></li>
<li><p>Both the Seabury-Western Episcopal Seminary you refer to and the nearby Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary are independent institutions that are not under the aegis of NU.</p></li>
<li><p>To suggest that Northwestern and Georgetown have even remotely overlapping religious tenors is quite misleading. While I don’t doubt that members of all religions could find a home at Georgetown, some students of "other" faiths might take issue with the crucifixes that still adorn every classroom. The school makes quite clear its own attitude about the dominance of the Catholic Church in defining Georgetown’s mission:</p></li>
</ol>

<p>From the Georgetown mission statement:</p>

<p>“Georgetown is a Catholic and Jesuit, student-centered research university.”</p>

<p>“An academic community dedicated to creating and communicating knowledge, Georgetown provides excellent undergraduate, graduate, and professional education in the Jesuit tradition for the glory of God and the well-being of humankind.”</p>

<p>From the “About Georgetown” section:</p>

<p>"Crucifixes and Religious Symbolism. The University has placed a wide variety of crosses and crucifixes, with descriptions of their particular significance, in all Main Campus classroom buildings, with the exception of the Bunn Intercultural Center, where there are rotating symbols of the various faith traditions represented on campus.”</p>

<p>What "isn't necessarily a bad thing" for some may be problematic for others.</p>

<p>From "Northwestern, The First 150 Years" The</a> First 150 Years</p>

<p>"Northwestern was conceived in 1850 by nine serious and devout individuals who met in a modest law office above a hardware store in Chicago. There they declared that in "the interests of sanctified learning" they would undertake "the immediate establishment of a university in the Northwest, under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church." </p>

<p>All had ties to the Methodist Church and at least three were Methodist clergymen, as was the first president. As late as 1920, the president had been head of Garrett Evangelical College. </p>

<p>Garrett and Seabrook are on land owned by Northwestern and have a 100-year renewable lease at $1 a year. This would not have happened without the influence between the administrations.</p>

<p>That the college was founded through its association with the Methodist Episcopal Church is not news. I understand that it has dropped any official sponsorship from the church, although I could not find a date for this. My point was that the old religious influences did help construct the underpinnings of the university and its policies. While it has moved away from such things as mandatory chapel attendance, it wasn't long ago that the town did not serve alcohol in any form because the university had strong ties to the WCTU, the leaders of the Prohibition movement.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Yeah, that's why the Georgetown student body is approximately 11 to 15% Jewish.
The ignorance on this board is sometimes amazing.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>that's extremely low for a top school, you clearly have no idea what you're talking about.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Georgetown has a Jesuit history, but it is not a religiously based college, curriculum and environment.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>wrong.</p>

<p>"Georgetown, with its commitment to the Jesuit tradition, believes that modern men and women should consider reflectively their relationship to the world, their fellow humans, and God. All students take a year of Philosophy and a year of Theology."</p>

<p>Georgetown</a> College</p>

<p>by the way "vienna man," as if you weren't already wrong and sounding foolish before:</p>

<p>In Fall 2004, 52.6 percent of undergraduates self-reported that they were Roman Catholic, 5.3 percent Jewish, 2.1 percent Muslim, and 24.1 percent another Christian denomination.</p>

<p>Georgetown</a> University</p>

<p>compared to:</p>

<p>Yale: 30%
Harvard: 27%
Northwestern: 20%
Columbia: 32%
Penn: 31%
Brown: 23%</p>

<p>Ivy</a> League schools</p>

<p>but consider yourself flattered that i just included georgetown in a comparison with these schools, something you're unlikely to ever see again.</p>

<p>elsijfdl,
Not sure why you're pounding this discussion because both are terrific colleges. Students/graduates love both and students of all faiths have had/are having good experiences at both. I also suggest that you revist your link above to the Ivy League schools. I think that the enrollment numbers are for more than undergraduate schools.</p>

<p>Okay people...chill out. Georgetown and Northwestern are both great school with people of diverse religions. Got it? Good.</p>