"Getting brilliant students to seek jobs beyond Wall Street"

<p>Getting</a> brilliant students to seek jobs beyond Wall Street - latimes.com</p>

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Fueled by the same anger motivating the Occupy Wall Street movement, students and professors at the nation's most prestigious universities are criticizing the high number of young men and women going into trading firms and hedge funds.</p>

<p>"The best minds of my generation are using their brainpower in ways that will not make society's problems better, and could make them worse," said Andrew Lohse, a senior at Dartmouth.</p>

<p>Lohse and students at Yale, Harvard and Stanford have recently written articles in their campus papers calling attention to the issue. And a new national campaign called Stop the Brain Drain is gathering signatures from students online and pushing for a change in recruiting practices on campus.</p>

<p>Faculty members and administrators at several elite schools have been devising ways to steer students in other directions.

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From Harvard's most recent graduating class, 29% of those entering the workforce went to finance or consulting firms, down from 47% in 2008. Meanwhile, 20% of graduates applied for Teach for America, a sharp rise.

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<p>Have 'em contact me. If they can raise their own funds (which is what salespeople do all the time), I can put 'em to work!</p>

<p>[url=<a href="http://www.friendlywaterfortheworld.com%5DHome%5B/url"&gt;http://www.friendlywaterfortheworld.com]Home[/url&lt;/a&gt;]&lt;/p>

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Chris Wiggins, a Columbia professor who founded an organization with a New York University professor to expose students to a broader range of career opportunities, said that until students are more aware of other opportunities the trends are unlikely to change.</p>

<p>"Many people don't grow up with a love for investment banking or management consulting — it's just something they hear when they don't know what to do," Wiggins said.

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<p>From reading this board, it seems to me many students are going to these schools primarily because they think it helps them get the investment banking or management consulting jobs. And I can't help but think the schools knowingly accept this type of student.</p>

<p>I agree, with alh. The people that get into the top schools are generally ambitious people, that's why they applied and got accepted in the first place. Then when it comes to post-graduate options, they want to get into the best, most prestigious companies/med schools, etc. I think that's why, for example, so many people apply for Teach for America, rather than going through the normal process of becoming a teacher.</p>

<p>Amazing article - makes a great point :) Thanks for posting!</p>

<p>I don´t know why this is such an issue. Most of those graduates do not stay. A lot of them can´t hack it, they either quite after a year or they go get their MBA after 2 years and move on to a different industry. Four people from my kid´s analysts program have already been fired.</p>

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I think that's why, for example, so many people apply for Teach for America, rather than going through the normal process of becoming a teacher.

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<p>Some of the factors for this include the exclusivity of TFA(Min GPA/Elite school background), perception one is performing public service that is short-term sacrifice, looks good on the resume for post-TFA job/grad school opportunities, and the fact one move on away from teaching with no penalties. </p>

<p>It's certainly far better to many topflight Ivy/elite college grads who do not want the mediocre pay, poor working conditions, widespread disdain/disrespect from parents/students/society at large, and association with a profession that is widely perceived by many such students as a haven for academic mediocrities. </p>

<p>A perception which has some unfortunate truth behind it IME judging by how several college classmates, friends, and acquaintances were admitted to top-3 M.Ed programs with surprisingly mediocre GRE scores and embarrassingly low GPAs(Below 3.0)....and still gained some scholarships. </p>

<p>One of them was a roommate who openly admitted he couldn't get into his Ivy's GSAS Masters programs with his stats.</p>

<p>You don't become a working public school teacher with an M.Ed. program. M.Ed. is full of theory and is stepping stone to degrees such as Ed.D. or PhD in Education. With those advanced degrees, one might be in the enviable position of analyzing education reforms or writing curriculum that tells actual teachers what to do each day in their classrooms.</p>

<p>To actually teach, following a B.A. you'd need an M.A.T. with teacher certification by the state. That's a more nuts-and-bolts training, combining theory, methodology and stints of supervised practice teaching. </p>

<p>Don't worry...your dimwitted friends won;t be able to teach real children with only an M.Ed.</p>

<p>^ ^</p>

<p>You can get hired with an M.Ed as it does qualify as a minimum educational credential in several states...including New York. Several of those friends did end up teaching once they got their M.Eds.....including some in the NYC public education system.</p>

<p>I'm not usually one to pass up an opportunity for cynicism, but there's this from Wikipedia:</p>

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Teach For America reports that nearly half of their alumni teach at their placement schools for a third year. Many others go on to teach elsewhere, especially at KIPP charter schools and other schools founded by Teach For America alumni. Still others train for administrative positions, and Teach For America now reports that 67% of its alumni are working or studying in education.

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<p>I'd rather see educated young people occupy the classroom than Wall Street.</p>

<p>Cobrat, since I don't know your friends or their exact pathways, in the interest of keeping information for other readers accurate, here's a link for others to discover how they might gain teacher certification in NY State.
Which</a> Pathway is Right for Me?:Preparation Pathways:OTI:NYSED</p>

<p>I agree with mom3tuitions, that your friends having completed an M.Ed is not going to get them hired as a class room teacher because it does not fulfill the requirement for initial certification. They are still going to need to pass the LAST, ATS-W and a content specialty test (if teaching in a particular subject area from 7-12) in addition to taking student teaching unless this part was taken care of as part of their undergrad studies. However, especially in teaching for the NYC DOE, the advanced degree will give them a salary bump on their line because it does help fullfill the 30 credits above the masters requirement.</p>

<p>If they get the M.Ed in school counseling, they may be able to come in an work as a guidance counselor, but even then there is a two semester internship component that must be fulfilled.</p>

<p>Lohse, of all people, is leading the Dartmouth protest? What would he prefer, that the brilliant minds of his generation snort coke instead? Remember the frat house drug incident two years ago? Ironically, the CC thread about that scandal accused him and his partners in crime of being spoiled, entitled rich kids. All the protesters with pockets filled with their daddy's Wall Street earnings can party on the quad together.</p>