Good place to hike on trip from Philly to Boston

<p>We are traveling tomorrow from Philadelphia to Boston and wanted to break up the day with a mid-day hike. (about two miles or so) Anyone have a favorite rest stop or state park in Conneticut? We haven't firmed up our route yet.</p>

<p>Climb up East Rock in New Haven, and then go get Pepe's pizza. :)</p>

<p>Thnanks, Booklady! I'll google East rock!</p>

<p>The only issue with that is that going through New Haven is the long route -- you really shouldn't be spending a lot of time on I-95 to go from here (Philadelphia) to Boston.</p>

<p>What I do is take the Garden State to 287, then across the Tappan Zee Bridge, then 684 to 84 to 90 (the Mass Pike). The last time I did it, it took me 6 hours to get to Cambridge.</p>

<p>Consistent with that, I might be tempted to turn the other way at the end of the Garden State, start up the NY Thruway (87) and stop at the Storm King Art Center -- an unbelievable outdoor museum of monumental sculpture by brand-name artists on hundreds of beautiful acres in Mountainville NY about 10 miles south of Newburgh. Then you could cross the Hudson at Newburgh and stay on 84 through Hartford to the Mass Pike.</p>

<p>^^^Love Storm King. Not exactly hiking...but a terrific and unusual spot. </p>

<p>Also, if do 87, consider New Paltz as a stop, there is terrific hiking in that area (Lake Minnewaska, and "the Gunks"). Plus New Paltz is a cute town with some terrific restaurants to stop by for lunch.</p>

<p>Another vote for Storm King here. Even if you don't go there, the route JHS suggests is definitely superior.</p>

<p>Storm King is fun, but not really hiking. </p>

<p>Another possiblilty just off 684 near Katonah (on 35) is Ward Pound Ridge Reservation. Westchestergov.com</a> - Ward Pound Ridge Reservation Lots of easy hikes, including one to a cave occupied for years by "The Leatherman".</p>

<p>I also very much like Welcolme</a> to the Mianus River Gorge Preserve. It's really pretty and near Bedford. It's also off 684.</p>

<p>If you prefer to stay on I-95 (which is the route google maps seems to prefer, but I admit we always go to Boston via 84) the Audubon nature center can be a nice place for a short hike: Welcome</a> to Audubon Greenwich</p>

<p>The 95 route goes to 91 in New Haven then north to 84. It's the same length of time as the other route except during rush hour in the evening. I used to run up East Rock. </p>

<p>If you look on trails.com, there's a nice hike north of New Haven in Meriden. See [url=<a href="http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=XAC008-022%5Dthis%5B/url"&gt;http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=XAC008-022]this[/url&lt;/a&gt;]. Most of the really good hikes are in the northwest section of the state, which is kind of off highway.</p>

<p>The last time I drove through Connecticut, on 95, going east, it took two hours from the state line to New Haven (about 50 miles). It's not distance that makes me avoid that route. (It IS Pepe's that sometimes gets me to take it, though!)</p>

<p>I like New Paltz. Never been hiking there, though. Love the Old Huguenot village, and the cemetery, and the old church, etc. Hubby's ancestors were founders of the village. Some day I'm going to go back and spend some time in the church basement where the archives are. </p>

<p>But the town is pretty enough, and the river is right there, so I imagine there has to be some nice hiking paths nearby.</p>

<p>Binx..there's a flat rail trail on the river. Real pretty. Goes about 12 miles so it's a nice ride up and back. </p>

<p>But there's great hiking up at Mohonk Mountain house (you don't need to stay there but there is a fee to get in). Lots of really cool places to stop like Gazebos set on rocks over deep cliffs. And Minnewaska State Park has a large deep-blue lake with lots of trails. And "The Gunks" have pretty loop trails where you can watch the crazy climbers. Love that WHOLE area.</p>

<p>JHS, we get on the Merritt and take that (it becomes Wilbur Cross) into New Haven instead of 95. Yes, it comes into the city on the wrong side for Pepe's, but the extra time getting across town is more than made up for by the lack of traffic jams after you leave NY.</p>

<p>There's a Pepe's in Yonkers now if you really need your fix: <a href="http://www.frankpepe.com/%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.frankpepe.com/&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>If I were driving Philadelphia-Boston and wanted to break up the drive with a hike, I'd climb Anthony's Nose, directly across the Hudson from Bear Mountain State Park (NY). From New Jersey you can take the Garden State Parkway north to I-287 to the Palisades Parkway, then take Palisade Parkway north to its termination at the Bear Mountain Bridge. Cross the bridge, turn left, and after 0.2 miles there's a small turn off with parking for just a few cars, where the Appalachian Trail crosses the road (NY Route 9D). Take the Appalachian Trail up to the top of the ridge (very steep climb!), where it makes a T. The Appalachian Trail goes to the left at the T, but you want to go to the right on the Camp Smith Trail which takes you along the ridge line to Anthony's Nose. Spectacular views along the way of the Hudson, Bear Mountain Bridge, and across the river to Bear Mountain. This was one of my favorite local hikes when we lived in New York City. The hike to Anthony's Nose is about 4 miles r/t, relatively short but strenuous because of the climb. It's not directly on the route to Boston; from the Bear Mountain Bridge, I guess I'd take Route 6 east to I-84 then on up through Danbury and Hartford. But it's such a lovely hike I'd be willing to go out of my way for it.</p>

<p>^That's a nice hike too. I didn't put it in because it's a little more out of the way, but it is a great view. I have a bad memory of that hike though because S1 decided to have a snit the day we did it and sat at the bottom of the trail and waited for us.</p>

<p>Northwest Park in Windsor....a couple of miles from either I91 or I84<a href="http://www.northwestpark.org/"&gt;http://www.northwestpark.org/&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Also look at CT state park site:
DEP:</a> Connecticut State Parks and Forests</p>