GPA of an Ivy

<p>College admissions look at many things
however, what is the GPA range of an average harvard, wharton, yale, princeton...accepted applicant, not including URM or legacy or recruited athlete
would it be 3.9-4.0?
lately everybody seems to be having a solid 4.0
also, would it be better to have a 2400 SAT with low 3.9 GPA
or a 4.0 with a 2350 SAT?</p>

<p>Most unhooked applicants probably have 3.9+ UW (with many having 4.0).</p>

<p>
[quote]
would it be better to have a 2400 SAT with low 3.9 GPA
or a 4.0 with a 2350 SAT?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>There are too many variables involved to answer that absolutely. In most cases, however, the latter would likely be preferable.</p>

<p>Gps is far more important along with says over 2250 and each section over 700</p>

<p>I think people who want to apply to Harvard usually have 3.8+ GPA, and 2200+ SAT. I mean Priencton Review states Harvard wants 2300+.</p>

<p>The fact is, let say we have 1000 applicants, assuming that 1/2 applicants have 4.0GPA and 2400+ SAT scores. Great. But if Harvard can only admin 100 applicants for the new class, how do you pick those 100 from the pool?</p>

<p>You don't really know how they pick people, but I am sure Harvard, just like any other powerhouse in the nation (MIT, CalcTech, Cornell), Harvard wants students that will bring potential uniqueness and benefits into the school community. So while maintaining your great 4.0 GPA and 2400 SAT, I think you need to work on a couple things:</p>

<p>(1) Are you involve with any extracurricular? Are award?
(2) Work on your application essays.
(3) Get impressive and remarkable letters of recommendation</p>

<p>I knew a former staff worked in the MIT admission office, and he told me something interesting: almost all of their applicants have involved with competitions like intel, Semi, Olympics. Many of them have won national or even international awards. Some of them are genius, with really good intelligence score. But they are only allowed, let say, 100 from 1000 applicants. </p>

<p>So how do you pick them? Again, assuming almost everything there have 3.8+ GPA and 2200+ SAT.</p>

<p>Now it gets to the second thing, your essay. This (or these) reflects who you are. I remembered this from another post: ->> your essay = you, but you =/= essay (maybe the other way around lol)</p>

<p>What he meant was your essay is the best way to reflect who you are to the admission staff. Even with full credits on everything, but if your essay does not appeal or convince the staff, I think they would consider you later, and go to the next guy and see if they can draw comparison.</p>

<p>A lot of great students did not get into good schools because their essays are not strong enough. </p>

<p>Regular letters of recommendations may not necessarily help you. They can even hurt you, sometime. Get letters of recommendations from teachers that really know who you are. Try to talk to them and ask for their opinions, and tell them more about yourself.
Teachers get N requests for writing letter of recommendations every year. START EARLY TOO. Admission staff are tired of reading the same kind of letter of recommendation: he is studious, hard-working, detail oriented student.... barh barh barh...</p>

<p>:) I am not in Harvard. But I think it's just my 0.2 for you.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Gps is far more important along with says over 2250 and each section over 700

[/quote]

LOL I totally agree. GPS is really important. Now I know how they invented the word G.P.S</p>

<p>
[quote]
The fact is, let say we have 1000 applicants, assuming that 1/2 applicants have 4.0GPA and 2400+ SAT scores. Great. But if Harvard can only admin 100 applicants for the new class, how do you pick those 100 from the pool?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I'm not sure to what extent "let's say" indicates that your numbers intentionally contradict the reality, but I suppose I'll correct you anyways (even ignoring the "2400+" :)). Harvard probably had fewer than fifty applicants with 4.0 UW GPA and perfect scores last year -- certainly nowhere near 500.</p>

<p>i feel that a 2400 would be more impressive though
since there are more people with 4.0 than 2400</p>

<p>and what range, like 3.95+, 3.97+, there are just so many 4.0
would a 3.95 and 4.0 mean such a big difference?</p>

<p>These aren't really practical questions. Just do the best you can to get the best grades you can and the best scores (and the best ECs, essays, recs, etc.).</p>

<p>Yeah, stop worrying about hundreths of a point of GPA. Class rigor is definitely taken into consideration. Far too many variables are considered to look at GPA and SAT. There's some indication to acceptance, but not at the specificity that you're talking about.</p>

<p>At my school a B is a 3.5, no matter whether you got 60ish% or 79% (the school's band for B), and an A is 4.0 (no matter whether you got 80% or 100% marks in class). THis is really really bad for me since if I fall into Bs.... it's a FREAKIN 3.5!</p>

<p>Wow, an 80%-score is the same as a 100%-score? That would be really great, but pretty easy too.. Then I'd have perfect scores for all subjects on IB-level.. Is that only in your High School or is that normal in the US?</p>

<p>Assuming my sat is about in the right area, how much would a bad freshman year (which made my gpa a 3.7ish) hurt me? Also, what do you define as hooks?</p>

<p>Hooks are typically: Legacy - family has attended - especially parents, 1st generation college student, or underrepresented minority</p>

<p>Drelnis, you think you have it bad, at my school, a B is defined as 86-93, and it is a 3.0 an A is 100-94 and is a 4.0, Even one B in a class can "wreck" you. I am lucky I have a 4, but the stupid thing is that next year the school policy is changing and a 89-92 is a B and is 3.7</p>

<p>^ sucks, that's how my school works. not to mention changing schools before 11th grade.</p>

<p>^ doberhound1, that's sort of the same problem I'm currently facing... I transferred between my sophomore and junior years, and will do so again between my junior and senior years. That transfer took a hit on my GPA, mainly because I'm currently not living with my parents anymore, as well as a number of other factors, including the ultra-competitiveness of my current school. Luckily, my next transfer will be to a school that isn't quite as competitive. I hope things like this are taken into account, and that the claim "holistic admissions process" holds true...</p>

<p>A B is my school is a 3.0. No questions about it. It doesn't matter if it is a high B or a low B.</p>

<p>I have a completely unrelated question, but do Ivies send likely letters to athletes? For some reason, I heard they don't do these things.</p>

<p>^^^ Yeah, I'm sorry about that. Good luck to you though.</p>

<p>would you say a 95% GPA is equivalent to a 4.0? or more like a 3.9?</p>

<p>95 is around a <3.85</p>