hard hard math problem

<p>each student in a group of 30 students studies german, italian or both. the total number of students studying german is three mroe than the total number of students studying italian. if the number of students that study both subjects is the same as the number of students that study exactly one subject, how many students in the group study only italian?
a) 6
b)9
c 15
d 21
e 24</p>

<p>Please explain how you got to your answer!! thanks</p>

<ol>
<li>Draw a venn diagram, two overlapping circles.</li>
<li>Notice that the same number study both that only study one, that can only mean one thing, 15 study both german and italian and 15 study only one of them. So write a 15 in the overlapping area.</li>
<li>Now we know that that the number of kids that study only Italian or German is 15 and the total number that is studying german is 3 more than Italian.</li>
<li>Let X be kids studying only italian be X, then the number of kids studying only german would be X+3, so x+x+3= 15 or 2x+3=15. Therefore 2x=12 and x = 6.
6 Kids studying only italian, 9 studying only german, 15 studying both, 30 total.</li>
</ol>

<p>wow thanks</p>

<p>this is one of the easiest math problems you'll see</p>

<p>@Bobtheboy
Honestly, what is the point of that post besides putting the OP down?</p>

<p>Wait, I'm confused. I thought it said that the number studying both would be equal to the number studying one specific language. In that case wouldn't it be 9 people studying italian, 12 people studying german, and 9 people studying both?</p>

<p>Hmmm I with you Vince011. Lol. Now I'm confused.</p>

<p>I was thinking...
1.) 30 = x + x + (x+3) or 30 = 3x + 3
2.) Then 27 = 3x
3.) So x = 9</p>

<p>X being the number studying Italian or the number studying both since those numbers are equal.</p>

<p>
[Quote]
Honestly, what is the point of that post besides putting the OP down?

[/Quote]
</p>

<p>Alerting him that he needs to study A LOT to get a decent score on Math1.</p>