hass classes

<p>just wondering, what are some notably difficult ones?
and some boring ones?
and some that you've taken and loved?</p>

<p>thanks!!!</p>

<p>and a question about hass-d. is it ok for me to wait until the spring of my senior year to take my last hass-d class?</p>

<p>and a random question: what exactly is early sophomore status...?</p>

<p>I really enjoyed 21A.216 (Dilemmas in Biomedical Ethics). [EDIT: Which I see now is a CI-H, but not HASS-D. Well, it was still a really good class.] Professor James provokes great discussions. </p>

<p>
[quote]
and a question about hass-d. is it ok for me to wait until the spring of my senior year to take my last hass-d class?

[/quote]

It is okay, yes. </p>

<p>Will the CAP and other progress-to-degree types bug you about it? Also yes. Will it cause problems if you happen to not be able to find a HASS-D you can stand and can fit into your schedule senior year (or if you're applying to grad/professional school or going on job interviews)? Also yes.</p>

<p>All things considered, it's probably safest to get the HASS-D requirement out of the way earlier rather than later. But procrastination is, of course, the MIT way.</p>

<p>
[quote]
what exactly is early sophomore status...?

[/quote]

Early sophomore status means you're considered a sophomore during the spring of your first year. You'll be assigned an advisor in your major department, have the spring credit limit lifted, have the sophomore exploratory option, and be assigned the full range of grades (no A-B-C-no record).</p>

<p>the reason i wanted to wait until senior spring to take my last hass-d class (which is going to be something in the arts category) is because i really want to concentrate in chinese and take the chinese streamlined classes from the very beginning to the very end. chinese i starts in fall, and the last one, chinese v ends in fall... so if i wanted to fit that all in i'd have to start taking chinese in sophomore fall and continue to senior fall. and i don't think i want to take an arts class on top of my chinese class because i truly and horrible at all forms of art.</p>

<p>how many hass classes does an average mit student take by the time they graduate? i'm probably only going to take 8, the bare minimum... is that rare?</p>

<p>also, if i'm applying to med school, wouldn't most of the application process fall in senior fall? should i take that into account and choose a lighter load then?</p>

<p>
[quote]
how many hass classes does an average mit student take by the time they graduate? i'm probably only going to take 8, the bare minimum... is that rare?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Plenty of people take 8.</p>

<p>Also, I think the definition of "arts" would probably be pretty broad under the new categorization, so still take the time to check it out.</p>

<p>
[quote]
also, if i'm applying to med school, wouldn't most of the application process fall in senior fall? should i take that into account and choose a lighter load then?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That's when your interviews happen. You should be done with all of your paper applications (primaries and secondaries) by the end of the summer (usually well before, around July) if you want the best shot. I anticipate scheduling some Fridays + weekends off this coming semester for possible interviews, but looking at this year's seniors I didn't think their med school apps affected their fall semesters too much.</p>

<p>I think it's worth having a slightly lighter load during the semester you're running around interviewing, if possible. I agree that it's not necessary, but it helps.</p>

<p>My cheerleading co-captain applied to MD/PhD programs, and was gone a lot during our senior fall. I took notes for her pretty frequently, and she paid me back the next semester when I was gone all the time interviewing for PhD programs. It can definitely get hectic, depending on how many places you get interviews.</p>