help! UW-madison or Oxford College of emory university

<p>Hey, so i'm a senior about to go to college and i'm desperately split between two schools and id like a little opinion. should i go to oxford college of emory or uw madison! please help</p>

<p>Wow! You could not have chosen two schools that are more different. </p>

<p>As you know, Oxford is strictly a two-year school that gives its students a very personal academic experience. The small classes allow students to develop close relationships with their professors. Graduates, in good standing, are guaranteed admission to Emory. The academics are very strong but come at a price. The school is small with little cultural exposure. It is true that you can participate in all of Emory's activities, but the distance from Emory's main campus limits opportunities. </p>

<p>My son toured Oxford and was enticed by the promise of ending up at Emory, but he simply felt claustrophobic. Some students like the small, personal schools, but he wanted to experience learning beyond the classroom. After visiting Oxford, my son knew that he wanted a large national university. </p>

<p>UW is a big place. While the activities are limitless, students can get lost in the crowd. </p>

<p>You have to be honest with yourself. Are you the sort of person that can easily fade into the woodwork? Or, are you a self-driven person that is ready to explore? If you are the former, you should consider Oxford. The two years, in a nuturing environment will help you mature into a leader. If you are the latter, you need a place like UW to develop your promise. </p>

<p>Both schools are very good. You just have to match your personality with the right one. Good luck with the choice.</p>

<p>^You know, Oxford College IS Emory. It's not Emory prep. It's not a backdoor. It's just that a bunch of people use it as a backdoor. Get the difference? </p>

<p>This is coming from a prospective Emory College student. I'm not really happy with how people use Oxford as a backdoor into Emory. They often complain that the 2 years are too long and how they don't like it. That only hurts the University and enhances the reputation of the college as a "backdoor."</p>

<p>From what you wrote, it seems that your son DID intend to use Oxford as a backdoor. Glad he's not going there.</p>

<p>Beretta 9mm,</p>

<p>I am sorry that you got the impression that my son viewed Oxford as a back door. You seem pretty sore about this subject. Given your chosen screen name, I am guessing that you have a lot of pent up anger. That's OK, I have certainly been in that state of mind. Let me clarify. Oxford is a school for kids that don't feel completely ready for the less personal larger centers. My son looked at Oxford at my insistence. I wanted him to choose between the smaller, more sheltered experience and the larger, more "worldly" one. </p>

<p>I don't know whether Oxford is a back door into Emory. My impression is that it is a different path to the same goal. I believe that you have brought an unintended interpretation to my writing. Of course, any university that accepts transfers, can, in some ways, be considered to have a back door. There is nothing wrong with that. </p>

<p>My son looked at Oxford at my insistence. I wanted him to choose between the smaller, more sheltered experience and the larger, more "worldly" one. He did not like the small school feel. During our discussion, he mentioned that he might consider Oxford because, eventually, he would end up at Emory. He was telling me "thanks, but no thanks." There was no back door plan. </p>

<p>As far as the OP is concerned, he or she still has a big decision to make. It might help to hear your evaluation of Oxford.</p>

<p>Plus most Oxford kids couldn't get into Emory. Don't delude yourself to save your feelings.</p>

<p>^But Oxford IS part of Emory and those students also get the bachelor's degree from Emory University. You can tell people that they're delusional until they outcompete you in the job market with an Emory degree.</p>

<p>And I'm not going to oxford so I don't know much about that place.</p>

<p>Coughdrops,</p>

<p>Bottom line: Both schools are good, but very different in ambiance. Like I said earlier, if you want more personal attention as a freshman and sophomore, go to Oxford. If you are ready for excitement and constant activity around you, go to UW.</p>

<p>Large, liberal public U up north versus southern small private school. YOU need to decide which best fits you. Look at the course offerings, especially relative to your potential majors. Will interesting courses be there?</p>

<p>Wis, we are talking about Emory, not UGA or Alabama. Emory is not a conservative haven. When we toured the campuses, the political and philosophical climates of both schools did not seem so different. </p>

<p>It comes down to personal needs. Oxford is not a four year institution. It is designed to be a stepping stone. Their course offerings cover the basic LA requirements that most universities demand. The "graduates" of Oxford transfer to other four year institutions. From what I have gathered, Oxford kids tend to perform well at their eventual landing spots. </p>

<p>My son has chosen UW because he feels ready to swim in a larger pond. His decision pleases me very much.</p>

<p>^Emory University's website says that freshman can enter Emory College or Oxford College, whichever one they prefer fits best. Oxford's designed to get you the Emory Bachlor's Degree, like Emory College, but with the option of transfering to other colleges after sophmore year LIKE EVERY OTHER COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY IN THE NATION.</p>

<p>It has a 2.0 requirement to transfer to Emory College, but seriously, even at Emory College, getting less than 2.0 GPA will result in threats to kick you out of the university unless you show improvement.</p>

<p>It seems that we have completey different understandings of Oxford. Yours is very interesting (in a good way).</p>

<p>^^^Applicants must apply to Oxford and Emory separately. They are different applications with separate fees and deposits. There are plenty of candidates that apply to both. Some applicants are accepted into Oxford and denied direct admission to Emory College. Those students that attend Oxford and perform well, are automatically admitted to Emory. In this way, Oxford can act as a proving ground for future Emory grads that may not have the stats to be admitted into Emory from high school. I see this as Emory's way of acknowledging that some good students develop at different speeds and under differing circumstances. </p>

<p>You may see this system as a "backdoor" way to gain admission to Emory. I see it as a way for the best students to eventually graduate from Emory. When you think about it, it is not any different than the way UW-Madison accepts students from the other Wisconsin universities. </p>

<p>Again, we are getting off the original subject. The OP has not made a college decision at this late date. Hopefully, he/she will make the right choice.</p>

<p>^I don't know what the hell your problem is. </p>

<p>I said in post #3 that Oxford is not a backdoor and made the distinction that some people use it as a backdoor to get into Emory by suffering for 2 years at an institution that they do not like. They're abusing Oxford. Yet you reply with "You may see this system as a "backdoor" way to gain admission to Emory."</p>

<p>In post #10 I specifically said that "Oxford's designed to get you the Emory Bachlor's Degree, like Emory College, but with the option of transfering to other colleges after sophmore year LIKE EVERY OTHER COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY IN THE NATION." Yet you have to reply with the statement "I see it as a way for the best students to eventually graduate from Emory." </p>

<p>They have the EXACT same application fee. You pay the same fee and can apply to both colleges with that fee. If you only apply to Emory or Oxford and decide to apply to the other one, you pay no additional fee.</p>

<p>They also have the same deposit fee.</p>

<p>Oxford does not act as a proving ground in anyway. They have this on their website: "Oxford accepts a broader range of students than Emory College but this doesn't mean our students aren't prepared for the rigor of Emory." Oxford</a> College - Guidance Counselor They are already prepared for the rigor of Emory when they get in. Since you're most likely to challenge this, I'll offer some proof. "Oxford offers a small-college setting with the <<<<<<<<<<same academic="" strengths="">>>>>>>>>>, innovative teaching and unique opportunities for leadership. As juniors, students continue from Oxford to the Atlanta campus." <a href="http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/atlanta-ga/emory-university-1564%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/atlanta-ga/emory-university-1564&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/same&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Are you even reading what I'm writing?</p>

<p>Okay, now I will mark you down as a troll and stop talking to you.</p>

<p>But, wait, I'm just getting started. :-)</p>

<p>Your pathetic usage of my choice of username to indicate that I have a lot of anger is completely idiotic. Did you use ltelepathic powers to find out that anger was the reason I chose that username? Uhh, maybe I use that gun for target practice with my dad who was a former US Army veteran. Maybe that gun brings back lots of memories of my dad serving in the army (Beretta is the standard issued US Army sidearm), and also a lot of memories of me and him hunting in the woods. Maybe my dad passed away and his sidearm is right next to me right now. Maybe I also like the design of that gun. </p>

<p>You have shown your ignorance of Oxford College of Emory University, which does not act as a proving ground for Emory College in anyway, and acted like a smartass who think you know how that place is really for. You know I'm going to Emory next year don't you? And I have the right to defend any divison of the university I'm attending. You must've misinterpreted my quote, "And I'm not going to oxford so I don't know much about that place." No, I'm not going there, and no, I don't know much about that place because I won't be there to experience the ECs, leadership, student life, take classes, etc. but that does not mean that I neglected to do my research.</p>

<p>I do think that me being angry would be justified, though. Except that I am not angry. :-p</p>

<p>My accusation of your son using Emory as a backdoor is completely justified, too. You said in your first post "My son toured Oxford and was enticed by the promise of ending up at Emory, but he simply felt claustrophobic." Uhh, Oxford IS part of Emory and if you go to Oxford you ARE going to Emory, no? So how does going to Oxford, a legit part of Emory University, entice your son the <<<<<promise>>>> of ending up at Emory? Hello, he'd be already there, no? That could only mean one thing: your sentence completely indicates that your son's reason for going to Oxford College is in order to end up at Emory College, which implies that your son was intending to use Oxford as a backdoor to get into Emory College for junior year. Emory's website: and US News: both says that you can get into Emory University through Oxford, which offers "the <<<<<<<<<<same academic="" strengths="">>>>>>>>>>, innovative teaching and unique opportunities for leadership." </same></promise></p>

<p>Yeah, you're right to be sorry that I got "the impression that [your] son viewed Oxford as a back door." Because it was completely your fault, not mine. But I'm sure you're not sorry given what you wrote about my username later. So now, I have the right to say "screw you" in order to make up for your sarcasm when you said "sorry." Actually, fk you.</p>

<p>Also, there is absolutely no proof that Oxford "act as a proving ground for future Emory grads that may not have the stats to be admitted into Emory from high school." (your post #11) Oxford offers the same stuff that Emory College offers and they both get the same degree paper in the end with "Emory University" written on the top. Maybe Oxford College and Emory College are so different that it is best to have separate admissions and applications so that those two can increase their chances of admitting the best types of students that would thrive in their distinct environments? Yeah, it has lower stats, but maybe it's because a lot of people don't like the small environment, like your son, so the type of applicants and quality of applicants, in part, would be affected.</p>

<p>hate
this page has it</p>

<p>Original poster needs to decide which campus seems to be the best fit. UW is one of the most liberal schools in the nation. Emory/Oxford are in a different social climate- Atlanta for Emory. Friend's son just got a degree there, different atmosphere than UW. We can't tell the OP which school best fits his personality.</p>

<p>Yikes gun boy lighten up.</p>

<p>hey,</p>

<p>so ive visited both schools and liked them for different reasons. </p>

<p>at wisconsin i liked the whole outer world feel stated above and the endless opportunities. I loved the huge sports scene and the school spirit. Its a def a huge plus that wisconsin is a very liberal campus that is really politically driven. Madison has a great vibe and would be a great place to hang out at. Of course, the big question is that i dont want to regret that down the road i'll long for a smaller school </p>

<p>Oxford, as stated before, has a much different feel. It is an enclosed campus and is just really chill. Because of its size, everything is laid back and its almost as if the whole campus is your backyard. Everything is much more personal. Yet, of course sometimes i think i know id like to be anonymous, and oxford is tiny. In addition, emory's prestige is def a significant plays a significant part. Also, there doesnt seem to be much to do? </p>

<p>so, considering that my main focus are academics, prestige and that i want to be surrounded by a student population that is intelligent, driven and aware; yet i still want to be able to have a lil fun</p>

<p>thoughts?</p>

<p>btw, i want to major in poli sci and journalism </p>

<p>i think my decision will come down to what im aid im offered at emory. Wisco gave me 11k a year.</p>

<p>Coughdrops, </p>

<p>Remember that UW offers learning communities that make the university feel smaller. </p>

<p>Good luck with your choice.</p>

<p>
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In addition, emory's prestige is def a significant plays a significant part.

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<p>Don't forget, Madison is also very prestigious =)</p>

<p>Personally I would pick Madison, I think there are a lot more opportunities for broadening your horizons than at a smaller school, even if it is a good one.</p>

<p>Poli Sci at UW! The overall academics are good at both schools- but to debate topics with faculty and students- more ideas. You should look into the comparative quality of journalism at both schools- Oxford/Emory is not known to me. With your last post I'm thinking you should go for the big school. A big place is composed of many smaller neighborhoods- you choose which ones to become involved in. A small school may seem limiting to you. You don't seem concerned about the geography or climate- some would find one too hot or too cold. Public versus private also changes who is in the student body. People at UW will be ready to challenge ideas, not go along with the status quo more readily than at most places- political science majors especially.</p>