Help!

<p>I have been seriously considering Wells, its looks perfect for me. However, with the recent posts I've seen it doesn't sound as good as I thought. I just want the facts. Also, how is their theatre program? ANything anyone knows from personal experience would be helpful, I'm trying to get rid of the rumors.</p>

<p>This is my first post, it is listed in Princeton Review's book "Best 371" and seems to get good marks. However, USNWR's has ranked it in the #1 Tier spot and now in the #3 Tier spot. The graduation rate was at about 52% when we filled out the FAFSA. </p>

<p>Wells is also in the 2010 Fiske Guide book, check there and see if the theatre dept. is one of the "Strong Programs". Don't buy the book, just go in and look at it in Barnes & Noble or one of those big box stores! </p>

<p>Very troubling, seem to be bombarding my child with emails and phone calls, but have not put their money where their mouth is! Their EFC for us is over the FAFSA's by about 10K or so! Gap! Big gap! So we do not understand where their "Average Percentage of Need Met" at 87% is coming from! Our child's SAT scores far exceeded their 50th Percentile SAT scores as well. </p>

<p>As their plans are to eventually enroll 800 students how are they going to attract really exceptional students by gapping them at about 10K or more? We are hesitant to enroll our child at this point, as they have a small endowment and under 1,000 students. The NYT had done an article about this at one point (within the past year) that colleges with those two factors could be in danger of closing its doors! Look before you leap... </p>

<p>Families these days cannot go into debt just because their child's need was not met by a small private college and the child really wants to attend! Most families will look elsewhere.</p>

<p>Rivers, my middle daughter was gapped 10k by every single school she got admitted to, so that alone doesn't say much to me.</p>

<p>My S is finishing his sophomore year at Wells. He LOVES it! The location and size are not for eveyone. Of the transfer students, most leave because Wells is located in a very rural area. My S said it's a 40min. drive to McDonalds (or any other fast food). The student body is small, so don't expect any wild frat parties. The campus is as picturesque as possible, with rolling hills, the lakefront (school has a beach and boathouse) and hiking trails. His classes have been challenging and interesting. I was concerned at first about the rigor of the classes, but am pleased with his intellectual growth. </p>

<p>Wells seems to attract students who have (or plan to find) their own purpose. These are not generally kids who want a "system" to prescribe a plan for them. They want to pursue their own interests and expect the college to challenge and support them. </p>

<p>My S has participated in several plays and two feature-length student movies. He is not a theater student, but some of his friends are. He has taken movie production workshops at Ithaca. The theater department is small. That means students have ample opportunity to participate. They also have the opportunity to create their own projects. </p>

<p>I have found the staff to be dedicated, accessible and interested in the students. This was also an initial concern, since much of the faculty is adjunct. My son had a music teacher who taught rock as well as classical guitar. He taught the students electronic composition and recording. It seems there is more latitude to accommodate students' interests and goals in the curriculum. Wells does not have the ivy-type pressure and competition. It keeps more closely to the libreral arts ideals. </p>

<p>I hope that helps you with your decision. Please feel free to email with questions.</p>

<p>Supr:</p>

<p>This is very important. I just transferred FROM Wells this January. Please, please for your own personal well-being...do NOT go to this school. I too was enchanted by the proximity to the lake, the "quaintness," not to mention the school's situation in wine country!
So. WHAT. There is a REASON that the retention rate is so devastatingly low. The school will screw you over financially, educationally, socially (maybe even mentally: my roommate went on Paxil when she got there; after transferring out, her malaise is much improved.) Plus (shh!) this school is tanking. That's why there's trying so desperately to pump kids into the school--it's broke! Count on getting screwed out of your financial aid package AND feeling like you're living in an asylum. The theater program is nul. I'll tell you more in a private message if you so wish, but I plead of you--don't attend this school and let your life become so derailed like mine did.
All the best and good luck.</p>

<p>Interesting post, Cornelia, we were gapped by about 12,000-13,000 and the increase of up to $43,000/yr or so was very unattractive! Glad we did not pursue it any further. I cannot understand how they will increase the student enrollment up to 800 students or so! </p>

<p>Sounds like they may entice you to enroll & then reduce your financial aid! Best to avoid a school like this, for anyone even thinking about applying, although those free Priority Applications are a rather attractive deal! Just a marketing ploy, according to New York Times article that was published this winter. A free application & we will tell you ASAP!</p>

<p>News:</a> Wells Faculty Cry Foul - Inside Higher Ed</p>

<p>Interesting relevant article.</p>

<p>Hmmm... They are heavily recruiting my daughter for their FH team...</p>