How appealing am I to Harvard Law School admissions?

<p>I know this sounds petty, but I am interested to know how much weight these "demographic cues" will have with Harvard Law School admissions. </p>

<ol>
<li>I'm a large percentage Middle Eastern/Arab.</li>
<li>My grandfather graduated from Harvard with an undergraduate degree in architecture.</li>
<li>He was a first generation 100% Middle Eastern/Arab American (an almost nonexistent ethnic group in higher education at the time).</li>
<li>He gave money to Harvard annually until the day he died and left a fair sum of money to Harvard in his estate a couple years ago (my remaining family continues to give modest sums to Harvard from his estate each year).</li>
<li>I am a woman.</li>
<li>I am a single mother.</li>
<li>I was born and raised in the deep South (sadly, no characteristic accent to show for it).</li>
<li>I obviously come from a highly-educated and affluent family.</li>
</ol>

<p>Clearly merits such as high LSAT scores and a high undergraduate GPA are going to help the most. (It probably doesn't hurt that I speak some of the world's most desirable languages either: English, Spanish, Arabic, German and French. Just need to try my hand at Mandarin..) But assuming I'm highly qualified for admission based on academics alone, how much will these factors I've listed help? How desirable do my demographics make me to admissions reviewers?</p>

<p>Any and all feedback is appreciated. Thanks!</p>

<p>-Isabelle</p>

<p>The Big H concentrates primarily on GPA and LSAT but as long as you're within their range I'm sure they'll choose you over their other applicants with similar stats. </p>

<p>I suggest you apply to Stanford which gives soft factors more emphasis.</p>

<p>None of those factors will matter much other than large donations, so if your family gave seven figures that is a plus. Otherwise it will be about your stats and achievements.</p>

<p>Graduate admissions is not like college admissions. The primary factors considered will be your LSAT score and GPA. The things you listed may help in some small way, but much, much more important are your stats.</p>

<p>These factors will compensate for a low GPA, if you have been out of undergrad for quite some time. However, they will not save you if you are applying fresh out of undergrad with a low GPA.</p>

<p>If you are statistically qualified, these interesting bits of history and... exchange, may push you over the edge over other applicants.</p>

<p>If you can get a 3.8/173 (normally borderline numbers), you're in good shape.</p>

<p>Only being a single mother might be worth mentioning if you have the numbers. Not even Stanford would care about the rest.</p>

<p>Admission offices are almost exclusively concerned with how smart you are, and they base that assessment on LSAT/GPA. Everything else matters very little, and mostly likely only influence their decision on applicants on the margin. The only soft factors that have somewhat of a role are internships at top firms (by which I mean Goldman or McKinsey), for although getting the internships are mostly due to GPA, doing the internships perfects execution and deadline meeting abilities.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Admission offices are almost exclusively concerned with how smart you are, and they base that assessment on LSAT/GPA. Everything else matters very little, and mostly likely only influence their decision on applicants on the margin. The only soft factors that have somewhat of a role are internships at top firms (by which I mean Goldman or McKinsey), for although getting the internships are mostly due to GPA, doing the internships perfects execution and deadline meeting abilities.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>This is true if you're talking just about Harvard. False if you're talking about every law school.</p>