How Berkeley picks its freshman class

<p><a href="http://berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/05/16_houtreport.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/05/16_houtreport.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Pages 66-72 show the specific variables used to evaluate applications.</p>

<p>Highlights:
1) Berkeley scores extracurricular activities by counting how many of them you have. Yearbook, school newspapers, literary magazines, Academic Decathlon, Science Olympiad, Brain Bowl, math competitions, Mock Trial, debate, Model UN, National Forensics League, and robotics club all count as major activities if you do them for at least a year. Young Entrepreneurs, FBLA, Future Farmers of America, 4-H, DECA, JSA, HOSA, ROTC, Key Club, CSF, and NHS only count as major activities if you hold a leadership position. "Fun" clubs like chess club, anime club, etc. don't count as major activities unless you're the founder.</p>

<p>2) Personal statement readers look for (a) evidence that you've done something not listed on the application, (b) evidence that you've pursued a passion, (c) evidence that you've made an effort to seek out academic challenges, (d) evidence that you've taught an academic subject to yourself or others. Tutoring, in particular, seems to look very good because it also counts as an "individual position of significant responsibility."</p>

<p>3) Work experience is graded on whether the position has academic content, requires special skill, and if the position has a "high level of responsibility." They also care how many hours you've worked and what you spend your money on.</p>

<p>4) AP tests: They count how many 3's, 4's, and 5's you get, but they don't care which AP tests you took.</p>

<p>There's also a nice section on racial bias and how little of it there is.</p>

<p>Enjoy!</p>

<p>Or you could go to junior college, major in something easy, take easy classes, get a 3.6+, write about some "hardship" you had, and transfer into this supposedly academically selective school.</p>

<p>the above poster is correct. </p>

<p>it's ridiculous how easy it is for transfers to get in and how difficult it is for high school students to get in.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Or you could go to junior college, major in something easy, take easy classes, get a 3.6+, write about some "hardship" you had, and transfer into this supposedly academically selective school.

[/quote]
.....</p>

<p>Hi! :)</p>

<p>Ehh . . . it's decently easy for high school students to get in and obscenely easy for transfers to get in. </p>

<p>What's hard is to get good grades after coming to Berkeley . . .</p>

<p>I swear each year Berkeley is turning more and more into an extension of community college and not the uber-prestigious public school it's reputed to be. </p>

<p>Hey you know what? I think our low GPA isn't due to Berkeley being especially tough... but what do you expect from a ton of community-college caliber transfer students being held up to the same standards as freshman admits who may have chosen Berkeley over top-notch private schools?</p>

<p>I'm going to join like every club in my school now. >_></p>

<p>Would being a Wikipedia Administrator count as a major activity?</p>

<p>@lolschool</p>

<p>People really forget how easy it is to get in as a freshman instate. A 4.3 with 2100 SAT is practically auto-admit; granted this is way harder than getting a 3.7 in CC, the enduring myth that Berkeley freshman somehow are the best and most talented is a bunch of ****. Many are, but look at the class profile and the average student and you'll quickly realize it's still a big state school full of kids that just tried a little harder in highschool.</p>

<p>I don't know if getting a 4.1 weighted GPA in HS is harder than getting a 3.7 in community college.
I guess it depends on your life situation. But in hs I didn't have to work/ pay my own rent. That makes a difference</p>