How does a US student get into University of Edinburgh?

@collegemom3717 which UK unis do you think don’t want American students? That would be good info to know.

Cambridge, it seems. Acceptance to LSE for Americans seems lower than average as well. And I don’t think Americans have any special advantage at UCL. Not sure about Oxford. Basically, the unis that draw strong(er) interest from the world ex-US (outside the UK).

Noting that there is a choice in between “wanting US students & their $” and “not wanting US students”:

Oxford and LSE are unmoved by US$$, and US students are accepted at a relatively lower rate.

Cambridge is also unmoved by US$$ and has told people that they are actively reluctant to take US students.

Not on our list anyway, but good to know.

In my son’s year, I think there were something like 40 US undergraduates. So a roughly 20,000 GBP fee difference at 1.4 GBP/$ rate translates into an extra $1.1mm for Oxford. Not chump change but doesn’t really move the needle on an annual expense budget of 2.1bn GBP (almost$ 3 bn).

As discussed here: Oxbridge admissions for Americans

Hmmmm interesting. I don’t think it’s that some UK universities don’t want American students per se. As far as I know UK universities do not have any country by country quota. They do have domestic student quotas however, which are particularly relevant for universities like the LSE and UCL. As such, I would assume such admission decisions are made on merit alone for these universities as opposed to origins.

Indeed, the LSE seem rather proud of their American ties - they have a dedicated department to the USA and advertise their strong ties with Pennsylvania, Columbia, USD and Berkley. Same for UCL with Yale and NYU. The London schools, in particular, make a big song and dance about being international in nature and the domestic/international figures bears that out: LSE is around 70% international, UCL is 50% and KCL is 30%. So why the lack of US students then (if that is even true)? A possible working theory (feel free to shoot it down if it’s wrong!): could it be perhaps that compared to other students, say from Asia or Europe (with comparable A-level or IB qualifications in line with British standards) that US students and qualifications fall slightly short are are thus at a disadvantage? These universities also require 5 5 APs if I’m correct, having never done them, I don’t know how common or achievable this is for most students.

Finally, perhaps there will be a change as a result of Brexit, there is a big concern over the shrinking of the EU ‘student market’. That gap will need to be filled from elsewhere.

That’s a very big deal: at some UK universities applications have fallen by 40 or even 50%. Many UK universities would likely want to be on the “May list of colleges that miscalculated yield” or would try to recruit Americans even for Fall 2021.
(Erasmus students were divided in 2 if you compare 2019 numbers with 2014/2015 numbers. Since then, the UK has also left the Erasmus program. That’s an added number of students not renting rooms in the halls of residence, not buying gym memberships, meals to go, and Student Union membership/beers at the Union bar…)
UK universities suffered great budget cuts and have become tuition-reliant. Each missing student is a huge problem for them.
So, as mentioned above, that gap will need to be filled.
Oxbridge, UCL, LSE aren’t likely to be bothered but many other universities might be.

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Did EU kids pay tuition?

Very true and particularly worrisome considering the lack of any announced bailout or funding oppurtunities from the government. Though, I wouldn’t be too sure just yet that UCL and LSE won’t be too bothered. Currently, the only university likely to benefit financially from this situation is Oxford. It’s been reported that LSE is in a particular spot of bother since a third of its students are from the EU. But you’re right the top schools, the golden triangle, are likely still going to be far better off than most other schools.

An over supply of domestic students, due to well needed COVID educational measures, and an undersupply of EU students leads to very unhappy universities.

EU students used to pay ‘home student’ fees which were capped at around £9,000 a year for undergrads (ie a German student will pay the same as an English student). Now, due to the UK leaving the EU, EU students will pay international student fees which are significantly higher.

Very true and particularly worrisome considering the lack of any announced bailout or funding oppurtunities from the government. Though, I wouldn’t be too sure just yet that UCL and LSE won’t be too bothered. Currently, the only university likely to benefit financially from this situation is Oxford. It’s been reported that LSE is in a particular spot of bother since a third of its students are from the EU. But you’re right the top schools, the golden triangle, are likely still going to be far better off than most other schools.

An over supply of domestic students, due to well needed COVID educational measures, and an undersupply of EU students leads to very unhappy universities.

I doubt LSE and unis at that level are all that bothered. EU students were paying UK (so “in-state”) rates and Oxbridge, LSE, Imperial, and UCL have a strong enough global reputation (especially among the current/former Commonwealth countries) to replace with higher-paying Internationals without seeing a discernible drop-off in student body quality.
Brexit probably makes it easier for Americans to get in to Warwick, KCL, Durham, and every other English uni, though. Maybe no discernible difference for St. A’s, though, as I don’t believe St A’s drew a lot from the Continent in the first place. Actually, maybe any of the ancient Scottish unis as EU students paid the (very low) Scottish rates there so would have been competing with Scots for places.

At English universities, yes.
At Scottish universities, they were treated like Scottish nationals (Scotland is/was trying to internationalize its campuses and paid admitted European students’ fees directly to the university) so, no.
At Welsh and North Ireland universities (…well, at Queen’s Belfast, really :p) Europeans paid half what English students paid.
As a result, since Americans pay international tuition, UK universities will only need to attract 1 new international to replace 2 or 3 Europeans - that was the plan at least. Therefore there’s some advertising going toward India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, but Australia and Canada are on that segment too and have been making inroads in the past 10 years. The universities most likely to be impacted are the middle-tier ones.
Add Covid and you have a perfect storm for British universities.
As a result, American tuition dollars will be welcome, at least for Fall 2021 and Fall 2022.
(In Scotland, the problem is bigger because English students paying English fees may not be sufficient to replace the “missing” European students. I agree StA’s won’t be as affected but it did admit European students and will need to replace them when its brand often isn’t as strong in England as in either Europe or the US.)

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English unis below the Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial tier may try to recruit Americans but considering how little known even UCL and Warwick are in most of the US (outside of academia), it’s more likely that the British unis that are seeing enrollment shortfalls will redouble efforts to recruit from Asia, where they had better brand recognition in many places.

I see your point but 1/3 of all students is a significant deficit to make up in just a couple of years. Entire applications patterns will have to change and there will be a lag before students, of different regions, will start to apply. It is possible that Oxbridge, LSE, Imperial, UCL and maybe Kings draw in a similar number of EU applications as to normal years despite the fee hike through sheer brand imagine but I think that is unlikely. There are a number of news articles on this that may be interesting to you (which I don’t know if I’m allowed to link).

Pretty certain St’s A’s brand is much stronger in England (amongst the upper/upper-middle classes, at least) than on the Continent.

Not really if the unis were rejecting an equal or higher number of applicants with equally high marks, which Oxbridge, LSE, and Imperial were doing. Granted, UCL may be the last uni on the pecking order that can say that, so unis below UCL may be worried. But LSE? Not so much.

The Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial tier (and likely UCL too) will simply be admitting equally qualified applicants from outside the Continent. Granted, that exacerbates the effect on British unis that are lower on the desirability list.

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The general perception here is that St Andrews is respected but not a top brand with it only really gaining prominence after the royals attended. Certainly, St Andrews presence on the continent is not particularly strong. Interestingly the general perception, and it is just perception, I and others I know have is that St Andrews is most popular with Americans and very much respected within America’s upper middle class (especially with the great lengths they go to make the application process simpler for Americans). I also hear of advertising at top US private/boarding schools like Exeter.

Yes, I mentioned India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan in particular - former commonwealth Asian countries, especially if they still have O’Levels/GCSE/A-Levels.
I’m sure they’ll also try to recruit in China but the HK issue may make it a bit iffy.
In addition, I wonder how many Asian students will be interested in Canterbury Christchurch, Brighton, Bath Spa, or Greenwich, just to name a few universities European students totally didn’t mind attending despite mediocre rankings…

US students will be welcome (one question upthread was about “which universities don’t want Us students”) meaning that if they apply they’ll get in much, more easily than before or than other students would, simply because there’s a huge shortfall of students and funds. In short, if someone wants to study in the UK, Fall 2021 or Fall 2022 may be good years to apply. :slight_smile:
(There’s also research fund shortfalls since the EU funded a lot of research and not everything’s been ironed out at that level. In the meanwhile, there was a “brexodus” of European top researchers in the 2016-2017 year in particular due to fears about European research partnerships, projects, and funding.)

As far as I can tell, St A’s brand is strong at Independent Schools not so much at public colleges and comprehensives. such students who have the grades for St Andrews would likely have other choices and I know its “posh” nature is discussed, one of the few universities for which it is AFAIK, as well as its “American” imprint.
On the continent, St Andrews’ brand rose thanks to Prince William&Kate, also for its top rankings in some subjects, and, well, (mostly?) because if you apply to Scotland for the free tuition/top school combination, you apply to all 4 “ancient ones” +1 safety and pick the one that admitted you - their criteria can actually vary.