How good with financial aid is NYU?

<p>How good with financial aid is NYU?</p>

<p>In general, NYU does not meet full FAFSA need, but for some of the applicants it wants the most, NYU can give enough merit money to make attendance possible without huge parent loans.</p>

<p>Merit money without need is a rare thing at NYU. Most of the $ they give out is part of their financial aid packages...whether they call it merit aid/grants or scholarships, you still must have need to receive it. They will come closest to meeting full need to those they want the most (like vonlost stated.) However, I would not expect anything above that and understand that they do not give merit aid (without need) except for certain talent-based programs and for the absolute tippy top of applicants.</p>

<p>I think it really depends. I was given a little over $46,000 which included a $3,000 loan. If you come from a low imcome household, they will try and give you full financial need. If not start searching for scholorships from outside organizations, they tend to be more generous. Remember: There's a scholorship for EVERYTHING.</p>

<p>Actually, they can't try to give full financial need because the endowment wouldn't support it. Here are the recent statistics:</p>

<p>i) On average, the percentage of need that was met of students who were awarded any need-based aid. Exclude any aid that was awarded in excess of need as well as any resources that were awarded to replace EFC (PLUS loans, unsubsidized loans, and private alternative loans)</p>

<p>Full-time Undergraduate (Incl. Fresh.) 64%</p>

<p><a href="http://www.nyu.edu/ir/pdf/cds/cds0910.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.nyu.edu/ir/pdf/cds/cds0910.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Section H2 i).</p>

<p>But it does depend on how much NYU wants you; that's where merit money comes in.</p>

<p>@HeleyC, would you mind sharing your EFC with us?</p>

<p>you can go back an search my posts from a few years ago.</p>

<p>My son graduated from CAS in May 2011. He had a 2250 SAT. he came from an inner city magnet school in Philadelphia and single parent home (never met his dad, I never got money from him).</p>

<p>Over the 4 years of his education my son received $125,000 in SCHOLARSHIP money from NYU.</p>

<p>He took subsidized stafford loans for 3500, 4500, 5500, 5500 for each year as well as 2400 in Perkins loans for EACH year.</p>

<p>My efc was 11-13K. I probably paid out (from MY savings) of about 60K over 4 years.</p>

<p>so when you hear about how NYU is stingy, they DO and HAVE given big $$ to some</p>

<p>we are not minorities - as white as can be.</p>

<p>My son is gainfully employed making over 50K and is doing GREAT since graduating.</p>

<p>Hmm. So for a family who's EFC is $3,800, do you think it's unrealistic to think about attending NYU?</p>

<p>Affording NYU with ease is something that happens when NYU wants you more than the other students. If your EFC is 3,800 dollars, NYU tuition isn't your greatest issue, it's room and board/living expenses because that's harder to subsidize.</p>

<p>From other posts, HeyleyC is part of HEOP in which there are a set of guidelines and criteria that are different from the rest of the student population and is only for NY State residents. FA is very generous to those who get accepted into that program.
In general, if NYU really wants you, they will try to entice you with a generous package, but you really have to be in the top SAT range with a really strong application and even then it would be a stretch. They will not meet 100% of need. Even with a low EFC, you may get very little. Just depends how bad they want you.</p>

<p>According to this:
<a href="http://www.nyu.edu/ir/pdf/cds/cds0607.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.nyu.edu/ir/pdf/cds/cds0607.pdf&lt;/a> (page 22/39)
In 2006/07, NYU only met 65.2% of demonstrated need for first-time full-time freshman and 66% for fulltime undergrads (including freshmen)</p>

<p>I think when looking at NYU"s financial aid holistically in comparison to its peers the answer is "not very good." In addition to the cost of NYU you also need to consider the cost of living in NYC and your own self control. Can you discipline yourself to avoid spending what you don't have?</p>

<p>That said, some students have been offered very generous packages. If there's doubt go ahead and apply and maybe you'll strike the jackpot.</p>

<p>^
I agree. I have heard mixed stories regarding spending. Although it is definitely possible to enjoy the area as an NYU student on a low, tight budget, there seem to be many expensive temptations and some peer influence...</p>