How hard to get into the honor college? how do they select students?any examples?

<p>How hard to get into the honor college? how do they select students?any examples? Thanks.</p>

<p>Here's the key thing: in order to be eligible for Honors (or for College Park Scholars), you must apply by the priority deadline, Nov. 1. If you miss that deadline, forget it.</p>

<p>I don't know how hard it is to get in, but I'm sure you could get some idea by searching posts from last year in this forum. Honors decisions came out in January, I think.</p>

<p>When we went to the Honors/Scholars presentation in the spring, we were told that the Honors program gets first pick, then Scholars, then Civicus, I believe. One of the staff at the presentation said in order to get into honors, you probably can't have any B's on your record (I'm sure there are exceptions). SAT scores are obviously very important for getting into Honors. The same goes for Scholars, but from what I have heard, they care more about how well you work with others, community service, extracurriculars, etc. I think the average gpa's and sat scores of Honors and Scholars are listed on the UMD web site somewhere.
Personally, I know more guys that were accepted into Honors than girls. I don't know if ethnicity plays a part.</p>

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One of the staff at the presentation said in order to get into honors, you probably can't have any B's on your record (I'm sure there are exceptions).

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<p>I know of kids who were admitted to honors with mostly A's and several scattered B's. They were taking a lot of honors and APs, though, and getting their B's in high-level classes--things like Gifted/Talented Physics, rather than standard Spanish I.</p>

<p>I got into honors with 3 B's, a 2180/1500 SAT and mostly AP / GT (honors) classes (except for classes like PE.) I know others who got in with B's as well so you can have some and be fine. They invite approximately 800 people each year to the program.</p>

<p>Sent from my MB860 using CC App</p>

<p>I got into Honors with a 96-100 in every class but only a 1990 SAT (1300 if you don't count the writing). So my SAT was low for the norm, which I think they said was around 1400. Lots of clubs, honor societies, and sports. Had some leadership - VP of National HS, captain of 2 sports teams, president of a club. Also had a lot of community service.</p>

<p>They may also pay attention to those odd little short-answer questions.</p>

<p>There was some unpredictability last year in who got Honors, Scholars, tapped for Banneker/Key, etc., that wasn't entirely explained by grades and test scores. I have to think that the essays and short-answer questions and whatnot must come into play.</p>

<p>Thanks everyone:)</p>

<p>If ~800 students per grade, how many courses only for honor students? (I know some colleges have a few honor students only have 1-2 courses just for them). What’s the advantage to be a honor student? Do they live together?</p>

<p>How many undergraduate colleges does UMD –college park have? And usually state colleges have more girls than boys, but UMD is not.
Thanks.</p>

<p>Just a note on the grades thing for honors - I had more than a smattering of Bs and even a couple Cs and got honors. My GPA was around 3.7 and my SAT and ECs were pretty good though.</p>

<p>In terms of courses, definitely check on testudo.umd.edu or ourumd.com. All courses with codes starting with HONR or with an H on the end are honors courses. Most honors program also have their own required courses, which begin with their own HONR class code; ILS courses for example start with HLSC. Honors students do live with other students from their program. Smaller class sizes (for honors courses), close-knit community and I think better advising are also advantages. The individual honors programs are all quite different, so check out their websites for more details.</p>

<p>The Scholars program is also quite good, and people who have a LOT of community service and numbers/grades high enough for Honors are well-served there. I had one D in honors, another in scholars....each was DEFINITELY in the right program for herself.</p>