How high in math should I be?

<p>By that I mean like what level math. I want to go to an Ivy league school, and most people who are accepted are at least in Calc BC. I on the other hand will only be in Calc AB my senior year. It is possible for me to self study Pre-calc though. But, my interests for college have to do mainly with biology (neuro) and history, nothing math related. Still, I feel it will show college i am willing to challenge my self. Wat do you think?</p>

<p>I know someone going ivy league on precalc, but other than the I know examples... Math is based upon your midde school math career snd thus you will be fine taking ap calc ab your senior year. As long of course you get as in your courses.</p>

<p>You probably shouldn't be high in math class.</p>

<p>oh wait what</p>

<p>LOL to Drought!
You would be fine in calc AB senior year. Spend your time on sometime more directly related to your current interests.</p>

<p>Having done so, I don't recommend self-studying and skipping precalc, particularly without needing to take an exam through the school to demonstrate competence (the minimum grade I needed on this exam to pass was a 90, as precalculus is vital to calculus). Do well in your classes, which makes more sense than skipping a year to try to get ahead when doing so could cause more headaches than it may solve.</p>

<p>I agree with Uroogla.</p>

<p>If you can think you can get an A in Calc BC, go for it. I doubt it'll come easy to you if you haven't taken pre-calc though. And on a related note, I didn't take Calc at all and I was accepted by an Ivy and waitlisted by another (Yes, I realize Cornell's admissions rate is more than twice Harvard's, but you did say Ivy.)</p>

<p>Biology is math-related, btw.</p>

<p>^ I think most people view Physics and Chem as more math related than Biology. In three years of bio classes in high school, the hardest math we had to do was figuring out percent change. Haha. I definitely would not consider it math related.</p>

<p>A biology major will almost always require physics and chemistry classes. It also typically entails a math requirement. Neuroscience has a ton of physics in it.</p>

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I think most people view Physics and Chem as more math related than Biology. In three years of bio classes in high school, the hardest math we had to do was figuring out percent change. Haha. I definitely would not consider it math related.

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<p>High school biology =/= actual biology</p>

<p>Anyway, the ship of non-quantitative biology sailed decades ago. You won't be using as MUCH math as a physicist, sure. But if you think that you'll be a good biologist without using much at all, think again.</p>

<p>Also, keep it mind that your field of biology dictates how much math you'll need. I'm a bio major, and I've been torn between going the Evolution or Bioinformatics route. Evolution only required pre-calc or something insanely low while Bioinformatics wants statistics and at least Calc II or Calc III/Diffy Q [can't remember how high... finished them both, so it never mattered to me].</p>

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I want to go to an Ivy league school, and most people who are accepted are at least in Calc BC

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<p>This is a myth. Most students take the most rigorous math course available to them and many admits get in through Calc AB, or are doing Calc BC their senior year.</p>

<p>I know you need math as a bio major. I was just saying that it isn't AS math related as other fields of science.</p>

<p>There was a guy in my sophomore math class in high school who used to say "Gee, I'm a tree," and laugh hysterically. You shouldn't be that high.</p>

<p>Regardless of your major (engineering or LAs), chances are you will want to take Calc again in college if it is required for your major. Respectfully, 99% of hs math teachers just don't teach on that level. So while you may earn a decent grade, you will not have the same knowledge base. You are better off taking Calc AB and getting a better foundation to help you in college than taking Calc BC and flying by the seat of your pants all year, just cramming for the next test. You will have missed all the basics, and more than likely your grade will reflect this.</p>

<p>Ninety-five % of the students that are eligible to take calc bc at s2's hs take calc ab. Not because it's easier, but because they actually want to learn. Of the other 5% most wish they did, and few are getting A's. This is an IT high school...</p>