How many courses per term at Oxford?

<p>Hello, I am planning on studying abroad at Oxford for the spring. I was wondering how many courses per term is the usual at Oxford. I will be at St. Peter's. It looks like for each term you choose a major and a minor for 8 weeks. For the major you meet 8 times, once per week, and for the minor it is every other week. Can anyone clarify for me? Thanks!</p>

<p>Congratulations on what I hope will be a great experience for you! While I can't directly answer your question, I just want to clarify some university lingo that differs here in the States from what it means in the UK. Courses, as in the classes signed up for, are called modules in the UK. Courses in the UK refer to the 'major'. To the extent of my knowledge, minors are not typically offered in the UK. It may be a different situation are you are studying for only a semester abroad.</p>

<p>Yes, zestokes. I am studying abroad for the spring semester.</p>

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[quote]
Congratulations on what I hope will be a great experience for you! While I can't directly answer your question, I just want to clarify some university lingo that differs here in the States from what it means in the UK. Courses, as in the classes signed up for, are called modules in the UK. Courses in the UK refer to the 'major'. To the extent of my knowledge, minors are not typically offered in the UK. It may be a different situation are you are studying for only a semester abroad.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>So... you have no idea?</p>

<p>I can't say that I do know the specifics about her study abroad program. The intent of that post was to clarify that the vocabulary being used (minor, major, course) are either completely irrelevant in UK universities or hold different meaning - which I'd say is pretty important.</p>

<p>^ you're wrong on that score. the word 'module' has no meaning at oxford.</p>

<p>Well I just checked with my son whose at Oxford in case terminology has changed. </p>

<p>As all previous posts have said there are no 'majors and minors' this is an american term and doesn't make much sense over here. Students talk about what 'subject' people are 'studying' or 'reading' (the latter mainly an Oxbridge term) and this refers to the degree. </p>

<p>Most people are aware that students in the UK pick a subject to study at degree level eg English or Physics, rather than picking a university and then building their degree up from a combination of a major usually declared after a 1 or 2 years and a series of minor subjects. This isn't the place to debate which is the better system, there are lots of threads on CC that have already done that.</p>

<p>However there are a few options UK students can make each year as part of their course but usually still highly relevant to their main degree subject and my son and his mates call them 'electives'. However unlike 'minors' they often do not count toward the final degree award at the end of the 3 years.</p>

<p>However these are for full undergraduate degrees and the JYA/study abroad programmes where foreign students attend for just one term or year I assume are structured differently. My son doesn't use the term 'module' because that suggests they can be added together to build a degree and his electives don't work like that.</p>

<p>Not sure if I've clarified or clouded the issue!</p>

<p>^ that's really cool that your son is mating with the natives.</p>

<p>^Well he is a native, we're English and as for the mating bit....well who knows......but I suspect he will consider it very cool!</p>

<p>you're English - are you an expat?</p>

<p>To carry on with the terminology. What the OP refers to as a "course" will often be called a "paper" because each one feeds into a different exam paper at Finals. </p>

<p>In the humanities the scenario in the OP is often what happens for Oxford undergrads, with the "minor" being spread over two terms so it still adds up to eight tutorials. However, you'd need to ask someone who's been a study abroad student at Oxford, rather an undergrad, if that is also how their studies are organised.</p>

<p>keepittoyourself - I'm english and living in England. Ifound this site when my son was considering applying to some of the US universities. He decided for Oxford in the end but I still amble around these threads.</p>

<p>Just wanted to point out that OP might be in some type of 'junior year abroad' program which is actually run parallel to the regular Oxford syllabus. I've heard of American colleges that send their students over to live together and study with professors from the home uni. So it is hard to answer the original question. But the terms 'major and minor' and 'course' really don't translate. Don't mean to be unhelpful - there ARE American colleges who send their kids over to be 'embedded' totally in a Oxford college. WashU's one year at Keble springs to mind.</p>

<p>^ they follow a completely different syllabus though, don't they?</p>

<p>I know nothing about the WashU syllabus. I do know that the WashU students at Keble take exactly the same tutorials/papers as the Keble students in their discipline (English). I have no idea how they are 'graded' for WashU purposes but I do know that more than one has later come back to Oxford to do a postgrad degree so presumably their transcripts didn't suffer. In fact, the contacts they made at Oxford probably helped them enormously in their application to M.Phil/whatever courses.</p>