How to determine number of students who receive financial aid?

<p>Is there a way to determine how many undergrad students at a given school receive financial aid from the school itself? Not Stafford loans or outside scholarships - but aid actually from the school in the form of scholarships or school subsidized loans?</p>

<p>You want to know how many students received "need-based grants" from the institution itself? ARe you including state and fed grants....or just institution grants?</p>

<p>Maybe the Common Data Set provides this?</p>

<p>Most school sites publish it. You could also check collegeboard. </p>

<p>It is really useless information though.</p>

<p>I agree with Romani that the info can be very useless.</p>

<p>I know that Collegeboard does indicate the number of students who rec'd aid, but that includes all those that may have just gotten a federal student loan...not necessarily anything from the school itself.</p>

<p>Common Data Set, Section H. I don't find it to be useless. You can get some value from it. Here are some of the major headings:</p>

<p>a) Number of degree-seeking undergraduate students
b) Number of students in line a who applied for need-based financial aid
c) Number of students in line b who were determined to have financial need
d) Number of students in line c who were awarded any financial aid
e) Number of students in line d who were awarded any need-based scholarship or grant aid
f) Number of students in line d who were awarded any need-based self-help aid
g) Number of students in line d who were awarded any non-need-based scholarship or grant aid</p>

<p>So you can see numbers of students who get awards and what types. Note line G about scholarships. You can also get an idea of the average need met but don't know any of the extremes (some very little, some a great deal).</p>

<p>When I said "useless," I was referring to Collegeboard's stats since they don't give such breakdowns.</p>

<p>That said, simply knowing how many students got X aid, may not tell you what you really want to know...and that's how much aid (if any) you'll be getting.</p>

<p>collegedata.com does provide that info. Very useful.</p>

<p>I prefer the common data sets for accuracy. Sometimes they are difficult to find on the websites and sometimes the information isn't even on the website. Search the college website and if it doesn't come up under "common data" sometimes it will come up under Institutional Research. Then I go to IPEDS data center and see what else I can find.</p>

<p>Actually, what I really want to know is how many freshmen are paying "full freight," defined as (i) paying the school 100% of the published tuition + room/board fees and (ii) not receiving any aid from the school itself to make those payments. So, a freshman who uses Stafford loans is paying "full freight" using my definition but one who receives a loan or grant directly from the school is not. </p>

<p>As to whether this data is "useful," I have no idea. I want to know it so I can respond to (either counter or agree) an argument made to me that kids from families who don't qualify for financial aid directly from a school (such as a full or partial scholarship) are subsidizing the educational costs of those kids who do receive scholarships. In other (non-PC) words, " families of rich kids are paying for poor kids, not only through taxes that support schools but directly through tuition costs that exceed the actual cost of education" </p>

<p>I'm not sure yet whether I think this kind of subsidy is a good or bad thing - I'm just trying to figure out whether it actually exists</p>

<p>*an argument made to me that kids from families who don't qualify for financial aid directly from a school (such as a full or partial scholarship) are subsidizing the educational costs of those kids who do receive scholarships. In other (non-PC) words, " families of rich kids are paying for poor kids, not only through taxes that support schools but directly through tuition costs that exceed the actual cost of education" </p>

<p>*</p>

<p>I don't know how that desired data helps you...or why receiving a fed loan changes ANYTHING....but the truth is that at SOME schools, full pay students are subsidizing those who receive aid.</p>

<p>On one hand, it can be argued that the UC instate full pay kids are being subsidized.....on the other it can be argued that they subsidize poor kids because the UCs have said that they raise fee/tuition rates so that more money can be directed towards aid.</p>

<p>That said, many privates say that it costs $60k or so per kid to educate, but they're only charging $40k (or something like that for tuition.)</p>