How to not daydream while reading?

<p>Whenever I take the SAT I reading section or any literature section for tests, I tend to daydream while I'm reading!! How do I fix this and become more involved with my reading to improve my scores?</p>

<p>Hopefully, you will be reading something interesting.
And if it isn't, make it interesting. Make up something that won't hurt your understanding, e.g. this boring poet is really a superhero in disguise (yeah, it's corny, but you get the idea).</p>

<p>You can also start reading books/comics/magazines you like. That will get your brain to go throw the motions of focusing while reading. Then when you come to something incredibly boring, your brain will automatically go through the reading motions. It will be easier to read boring stuff. </p>

<p>At least, that's what I did, and it worked. I got 690.</p>

<p>I don't have any good tips, I usually just concentrate because I know in the back of mind, if I slack off, my score will suffer. Some people need to do what Truthbetold said, try to make the passage more interesting.</p>

<p>My first thought is, read something more interesting. But of course you don't have that option here. I'd suggest you look over the passage-related questions first. That way you'll know what you're looking for in the passage, which should help you stay engaged in the reading/skimming.</p>

<p>I didn't give a **** about native americans, MLK Jr, interpretive dance, etc. I
did, however, care about getting an 800. which I did ;)</p>

<p>Lol take ACT reading its tons more interesting.</p>

<p>If you tend to daydream while reading long passages, don't read the passage at all. Start with the first line citation question and answer it by referencing the stated line (they go in order). After that, you should have a good enough "feel" for the passage that you'll be able to answer the more general questions. </p>

<p>Used this technique for the AP English Language & Composition Exam and got a 5.</p>

<p>After I finish skimming a paragraph (key word: skimming), I write a 3-4 word summary next to it (the main idea of the paragraph, how it advances the passage). It forces you to actually pay attention to what you're reading.</p>

<p>Examples:
work = lose innocence
love both cultures</p>

<p>Either read more interesting things then build up stronger reading skills or do what I do:</p>

<p>Make innappropriate connotations between the characters and stuff making it totally more interesting. It's also fun to make remarks in your mind that keep you on track because that way you still pay attention and get the info without falling asleep. Like commentating on how much of a dipwad that character is, who the hell studies underwater squid, or something--innuendos are great. :D</p>

<p>Underlining important words can help keep you focused.</p>

<p>adderall jk but seriouly sometimes you day dream when you have low energy. Make sure you have gotten a good nights sleep and if not caffien it up</p>

<p>Medication if you're ADD or have some other disorder, otherwise suck it up (assuming you're getting enough sleep, food, etc).</p>

<p>lolol thanks so much! i think they were all very helpful!</p>

<p>
[quote]
Medication if you're ADD or have some other disorder, otherwise suck it up (assuming you're getting enough sleep, food, etc).

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Ah, the medication method haha. I don't have any personal experience with this, but I've heard of people without ADD taking ADD medication in order to stay focused for hours on end. I think there was an article posted on here that detailed the schematics. I guess if someone was desperate enough...</p>

<p>But seriously, stay clean, stay lean, stay NATURAL!</p>

<p>I used the method that Jamesford describes to great effect on the SAT CR and SAT Literature. It helps keep you focused and comprehending what you are reading, and it's an easy way to glance back for a question like "what is the key point of paragraph 5?".</p>

<p>writing some conclusion from passage while you're reading may help!</p>

<p>underline.</p>

<p>??!?!.. it was supposed to be in caps. ):</p>

<p>I just tell myself that it's not a matter of whether the content or the material is boring, but it has more to do with my approach towards it. Going in with the mentality that the passage is boring is somewhat of a self-fulfilling prophecy.</p>

<p>If you approach the passage as it is the most interesting on Earth or enforce the mentality that you looking for something in the passage, it wouldn't be as bad.</p>