How well rounded is academics

<p>So i was wondering how well rounded the academic programs are at this school? is it more liberal artsy since i dont really wan’t that? does it have a good focus on the sciences if i would want to pursue something along the lines of biology, chemistry or medicine? thanks, just starting to look at colleges (a rising junior) and this matched a lot of the things i want in a school outside of academics (near water, big sports, good school)!</p>

<p>BC has a Core curriculum, so it requires such liberal arts courses as English, philosophy, theology, history......and math and science. If you don't like to write, then a college with a more general distribution requirements might be better for you.</p>

<p>Science classes at BC are very technical. The graduation requirements may not allow you to take as many of them as you may like, however. Your interest in pre-med will also limit opportunity to dabble in sciences other than biology and chemistry.</p>

<p>A large chunk of the students body are pre-med and biology/chemistry or both majors. The biology and chemistry programs are well regarded and qualified graduates have a better than average chance to get into med school of their choice.</p>

<p>That being said, BC is a Jesuit school that believes you need to be exposed to as many different subjects as possible, before deciding what you want to try to do for the rest of your life. Undergraduate college is the opportunity to explore different topics and perhaps discover something that inspires you. You'll have time later to focus on what turns you on. As a result you won't have time to take all the science courses that you may want, especially if you want to do more than scratch the surface in something like physics while you take all the chemistry and biology needed for pre-med. The pre-med tract pretty much fills your science coursework quota, you will be diverted from elective science courses you may want to required courses in philosophy, history, and the arts. Other colleges have fewer arts requirements. </p>

<p>BTW, the BC Science major course workload is heavier than just about any other school (equivalent of 5 vs 4 classes) as labs don't count towards graduation. High school honors course are not counted toward graduation credit. They just allow you to bypass the introductory classes and get into more advanced classes early. </p>

<p>So I think BC is more liberal artsy than many science focused schools, but that is not all bad. It is a well rounded program, but the pre-med biology/chemistry coursework will make pursuing other sciences in depth difficult (you'll have time for the introductory courses).</p>

<p>The BC web site for the various colleges provide samples of what each tract will involve, and just how many liberal artsy courses are required. Its just that the pre-med biology/chemistry recommendations take up so much of your science requirements there is little time left for other sciences.</p>

<p>You need to define "liberal artsy" for me. Traditionally the "liberal arts" encompass languages, literature, math, science and social sciences (e.g, history, philosophy). Science departments are usually housed within a subset of the school called something like "College of Liberal Arts" or "College of Arts & Sciences", etc. So saying you want to study the sciences (bio/chem) is saying you want a liberal arts based education. </p>

<p>Studying biology/chemistry at most major universities is going to come with a set of non-science requirements often called something like "Core Classes" or "Basic Reqs". Some schools will say if you're a science major you need 3 social science classes, 3 humanities classes and a language, others will be more or less specific. As ColdCase points out, at BC the track may be a little bit more defined than at other schools. But you will have options as to what areas you want to explore - for, example, there is a philosophy requirement at BC, but there are a plenty of different types of classes to choose from. So to answer you question: "How well rounded is [are the] academics?" Very.</p>

<p>
[quote]
A large chunk of the students body are pre-med and biology/chemistry or both majors.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Depending on one's definition of "large", I would disagree with this statement. Biological and Physical sciences comprise less than 10% of the student body. (source: IPEDS)</p>

<p>
[quote]
The biology and chemistry programs are well regarded and qualified graduates have a better than average chance to get into med school of their choice.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Chemistry, yes......</p>

<p>
[quote]
BTW, the BC Science major course workload is heavier than just about any other school (equivalent of 5 vs 4 classes)...

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yes, but that's what makes it fun. (And helps premeds score higher on the MCAT VR! And, IMO, makes premeds a little more marketable to med schools since they are not one-trick (science) ponies.)</p>

<p>
[quote]
...labs don't count towards graduation.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I believe that has changed for the Class of '14 since BC is switching to units for graduation. </p>

<p>OP:</p>

<p>Listed below is a link to BC's core requirements. Note, while BC only rarely offers AP/IB credit, high scores (4+ on AP) can be used to fulfill core requirements, enabling you to take more electives.</p>

<p>University</a> Core Requirements - Boston College</p>