I am hispanic. Do you think I went to college thanks to affirmative action?

<p>Affirmative action didn't help me get accepted to my first choice schools. It also didn't help me find a lucrative or a prestigious job after graduation. I suspect that if affirmative action didn't exist, the likelihood that I had done better in terms of employment would have been greater, since there would have been less suspicion and speculation about my merits. I also feel that being a hispanic college student, in the US, is not as good as some people make it seem, because when people don't treat you like a case of affirmative action, you are paranoid that, deep inside, they still see you as a case of affirmative action. Throughout my college career, I also felt pressured to do well academically, because otherwise I knew I would have felt guilty of validating negative perceptions about hispanic students. All in all, I feel I would have been better off in terms of employment and self-esteem if there was no affirmative action.</p>

<p>Good for you for taking such initiative!</p>

<p>But as for others...it really depends. Many minority students do get into college on their own merit. Which is great, more power to them.</p>

<p>But in other cases, it's not uncommon to see race boost ahead applicants that wouldn't otherwise be accepted.</p>

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All in all, I feel I would have been better off in terms of employment and self-esteem if there was no affirmative action.

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<p>I believe the UC Regents guy who is half black did not think it's a good idea. He is behind the backing of Prop 209.</p>

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Affirmative action didn't help me get accepted to my first choice schools.

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<p>How do you know? Nobody in the world ever knows what gets them into universities unless their parents donated 10 million dollars.</p>

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<p>But it's possible to know what didn't get them accepted into universities. How can I be so sure affirmative action didn't get me accepted into my first choice schools? I didn't get accepted...</p>

<p>I went to law school and got a job at a large firm way back when women were admitted and hired under affirmative action (this is true, but hard to believe considering the gender make-up of colleges today).</p>

<p>I worried that everyone (i.e. men) would assume that the only reason I was permitted to grace their presence was because of affirmative action. They probably did think this initially, but after a very short while they learned and accepted that I was as capable as they were. So it didn't matter in the long run, and to this day I do not know whether or not I actually benefitted from AA. (And look where women are today!)</p>

<p>Same here OP, totally agree with you, 100%. I feel the same way, I am #1 in class now and have sats in the top 25% for top colleges. There is a reason I got accepted(and it is not necessarily aa, in fact, probably not at all), but it still in the back of my mind, and I know others see it too. But I know I deserved it, but how do others know that...Thus I see your point.</p>

<p>I see a valid point in what you're saying jkjkjkj, and can see where you're coming from. </p>

<p>On that same note i don't know if the OP is real, first post and he rattles off the anti-AA check list exactly point by point.</p>

<p>kayake,</p>

<p>I have never heard a minority say affirmative action hurt them, as you are saying now. </p>

<p>I know this guy who applied to Brown last year. He was pretty much the "whitest" guy I've ever met. He was a mediocre student with a SAT score around 2000 and a top 50% class rank. He had no ECs, played no sports, and was not a legacy. That being said, he got into Brown. Oh, I forgot to mention he put he was black - or partially black. He was 1/16th black and he made sure Brown knew it!</p>

<p>I don't understand the uproar about affirmative action.</p>

<p>What's the legacy system, if not affirmative action for rich, white kids?</p>

<p>Be thankful. You don't get into college just because of AA. Your merits get you in, AA just helps.</p>

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Be thankful. You don't get into college just because of AA. Your merits get you in, AA just helps.

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<p>True, but that's not the way most people think.</p>

<p>"gets you in" vs "helps get you in".. we dont need your semantics right now</p>

<p>How about you use all that pent-up injustice towards AA and work to get it abolished, since you and other Hispanics are only hurt by it? kthxbai</p>

<p>you probably went to college with affirmative action considerations, even if it is a little, it mattered. Depending on th competitiveness of the college, the affirmative action could be a deciding factor. However, if you were a super uber amazing candidate, then no, it probably added an extra glowing coating to your application but for the most part it probably played an important part. Put it this way, a hispanic in my school got into NYU with mediocre SATs meaning 1700, GPA unweighted of low 80s, and little to no ECs.</p>

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Be thankful. You don't get into college just because of AA. Your merits get you in, AA just helps. </p>

<p>True, but that's not the way most people think.

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<p>Because no matter how small of a benefit AA might have been to you, people nevertheless never know if you could be the place you are without that boost. And because it's a boost that you receive and others of a different skin color do not, there will naturally be resentment.</p>

<p>Who are the greatest benefactors of Affirmative Action? Let's see...</p>

<p>For instance, whites hold over ninety percent of all the management level jobs in this country (1), receive about ninety-four percent of government contract dollars (2), and hold ninety percent of tenured faculty positions on college campuses (3). Contrary to popular belief, and in spite of affirmative action programs, whites are more likely than members of any other racial group to be admitted to their college of first choice (4). Furthermore, white men with only a high school diploma are more likely to have a job than black and Latino men with college degrees (5), and even when they have a criminal record, white men are more likely than black men without one to receive a call back for a job interview, even when all their credentials are the same (6). Despite comparable rates of school rule infractions, white students are only half to one-third as likely as blacks and Latino youth to be suspended or expelled (7); and despite higher rates of drug use, white youth are far less likely to be arrested, prosecuted or incarcerated for a drug offense than are youth of color (8). </p>

<p>Of course this has very little to do with privilege and more with merit. [sarcasm off] </p>

<p>When you look at facts such as these its a pity that anyone would let those uninformed poor souls who may resent them, have any real tangible effect on their lives. Those who have benefitted from AA need not feel pity nor shame for capitalizing on this particular brand of opportunity. When viewed in a larger scope, the few opportunites granted via AA hardly make a splash in the big picture. The resentment when viewed in this context would be almost laughable if the stakes weren't so high.</p>

<p>Very well done, madville.</p>

<p>Co-sign. You pretty much said it all.</p>

<p>I think people who advocate AA are far more racist and bigoted than those who don't. Generalizing people by race is the basis of racism, and it is also exactly what AA does to "encourage" development in the black, hispanic, and other minority communities.</p>

<p>^^^
Blah, blah, blah. I'm going to save you some trouble. Here's an AA debate that already took place no too long ago. <a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/college-admissions/441477-fastest-growing-ethnic-category-great-colleges-race-unknown.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/college-admissions/441477-fastest-growing-ethnic-category-great-colleges-race-unknown.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Something you should know: Affirmative Action is a totally separate issue than the whole Asians being expected to achieve more.</p>

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I think people who advocate AA are far more racist and bigoted than those who don't. Generalizing people by race is the basis of racism, and it is also exactly what AA does to "encourage" development in the black, hispanic, and other minority communities.

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Why say that? That does not even make sense. Anyways, read up on the issue in the thread I posted. We pretty much went though everything that can be argued here. Oh yea, I support Affirmative Action and I am by no means racist.</p>