I need some help about diplomacy...

<p>so im probably going to a local Pittsburgh college like Duquesne University... a good school and i plan on going to Gradute school at somewhere like University of Pittsburgh, Penn State or Boston College.</p>

<p>I'm not fluent in any languages but I would like to be a diplomat... i would love to learn French, very beautiful and nice language. so my question is would the government teach me French if i become a diplomat or would i have to learn it on my own...?</p>

<p>any advice or info about diplomacy would be wonderful....</p>

<p>There are government agencies that will send you for language training. It is helpful, however, to have some kind of foundation that might indicate a talent for languages. The NSA (Nat'l Security Agency) has programs for languages. The military has foreign area officers as well. To become a diplomat, you would probably develop language and culture skills prior to any assignment.</p>

<p>Additionally, Pitt has summer language programs where you complete an entire year of language in 10 weeks. Language immersion programs are common across the country.</p>

<p>French used to be the language of diplomacy; I'm not sure that's true any more. You may want to pick up a different language if you want to be a diplomat - Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Arabic.</p>

<p>Study abroad, that should help you learn a language (in addition to taking classes).</p>

<p>A diplomat isn't a job.</p>

<p>It's a generic term for someone from our government working overseas, often times with the State Department or a liason. </p>

<p>Agencies provide language training but it's based on assignments. If you got hired by the State Department, I can assure you your first assignment (typically 2 years) won't be Franch - it will probably be somewhere in Africa, South America, Asian, or some dumpy European country. The "nice" countries are coveted position, and senior staff typically get them.</p>

<p>You need to research your goals better, because you don't seem like you have a realistic view of how these careers work.</p>

<p>P.S. When most people use the term "Diplomat", they are referencing a Foreign Service Officer, or one of it's subdivisions (Political, Economic, Health, Education). If you get hired, you have domestic training, then are sent overseas based on the needs of the agency. They will supply you with further training upon receiving your assignments.</p>

<p>^ agreed. and surely studying abroad would help too.</p>

<p>Two years ago I met a former ambassador whose current job was to recruit college students to become foreign service officers. He said that was one of the few sectors of government that is hiring. He also said that while in the past it was necessary for such hires to be fluent in a foreign language that is no longer the case. </p>

<p>He also said that there are scholarships for, I think, rising college seniors interested in working for the state department.</p>

<p>In addition, if one becomes a diplomat, the government will educate you in the language/culture of the country you're assigned to.</p>

<p>If you join the Foreign Service (not an easy thing to do, especially right out of undergrad) and you are assigned to a post where you do not speak the language then prior to taking up your assignment you will be sent to the Foreign Service Institute to study the language you need. You will be paid while you study at your normal salary, since your job will be to learn the language. </p>

<p>However, already knowing a language makes you a much more competitive applicant for the Foreign Service. In order to join, you have to first pass the written exam. If you pass (and many don't the first time), you will be asked to take the Oral exam. Even fewer people pass that. If you pass the Oral exam, you are put on a list with all the other successful candidates. Your position on that list is determined by what qualifications you have. A master's degree moves you up the list, so does knowing a language, there are a bunch of different factors. The people at the top of the list are actually offered positions with the Foreign Service, assuming they can then pass a medical and security clearance. </p>

<p>So it takes a long time and it's hard to do with just a bachelor's degree (though not impossible by any means). I would reccommend starting to learn a language now, particularly a "critical language" like Arabic or Farsi or Chinese or Bengali. You can apply for a government summer scholarship to study these in a native-speaking country all expenses paid. It's also another qualification that helps you on the list. </p>

<p>I agree with BeB, you need to do more research. The State Department has a very thorough useful careers website you should check out.</p>

<p>lol, the government is hiring in nearly every single sector. We are becoming bigger and bloated as I type this message.</p>

<p>Becoming a Foreign Service Officer directly out of college is very difficult. I'm sure some make the jump, but they are the exception rather than the rule.</p>

<p>The process is long and competitive. Another good position to look at is the USAID Junior Officer program. The people who usually get hired have their BA/MA, military experience or some experience working overseas, peace corps, teaching, ect.</p>

<p>Studying abroad doesn't really do much. It shows you have an interest overseas, but that's about it. It doesn't really get taken into consideration during the hiring process, at least not with any real weight.</p>

<p>I think every student I went to college with wanted to work for the State Department (Poli Sci major), and very few if any currently do so. The reality of the job hits you pretty hard once you get older. I mean, do you really want to raise a family in Chad? Or the Congo?</p>

<p>Good luck, wish you the best.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you got hired by the State Department, I can assure you your first assignment (typically 2 years) won't be Franch - it will probably be somewhere in Africa, South America, Asian, or some dumpy European country.

[/quote]

Large parts of Africa = French language. That's why Red Cross jobs in Africa require people to speak English and French.</p>

<p>"he reality of the job hits you pretty hard once you get older. I mean, do you really want to raise a family in Chad? Or the Congo?"</p>

<p>While I wouldn't have wanted to do this (and that's why we never became State Dept. families) I know people who were raised like this and who raised their families like this and greatly enjoyed it.</p>

<p>Large parts of Africa = French language. That's why Red Cross jobs in Africa require people to speak English and French. ~ BillMC</p>

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<p>It was a typo dude, it was meant to say France.</p>

<p>His/her first assignment wouldn't be in France. A french speaking country maybe - but whatever.</p>

<p>^ Well, the Congo at least is an unaccompanied post (Chad probably is too) so you can't raise a family there. But moving every 2-5 years can be hard on a family. The bigger problems I think however are the challenges inherent in working within a large bureaucracy. The State Department is by no means the only job nor the best job for people interested in work that involves international travel and doing good in foreign countries or promoting greater intercultural understanding. </p>

<p>One thing to definitely look into (and you can find this on hte State Dept. careers pages) are the numerous graduate fellowships and one or two undergraduate fellowships the State Dept. offers. Those can help a lot to fast-track you into life in the Department or in the Civil Service.</p>

<p>While I wouldn't have wanted to do this (and that's why we never became State Dept. families) I know people who were raised like this and who raised their families like this and greatly enjoyed it. ~ Northstarmom</p>

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<p>Yeah, well if you read what I wrote in context you will see that I was talking about the majority of people, and how as you get older the job loses it's sexyness and appeal for most people.</p>

<p>Nearly every IR/Poli Sci major says they want to work for the State Department, then the reality hits and most change their mind when they find out they won't be living in London or Paris.</p>

<p>This is why I recommend the military, you can do all the traveling you want - but you do it with guns and tanks.</p>

<p>Nothing says diplomacy quite like a M16.</p>