I want to take some time off, but..

<p>Hello, I'm currently a sophomore at UC university.</p>

<p>I'll get straight to the point: I'm immature and can't control myself, so I want to take some time off, but my parents want me to keep on trying.</p>

<p>My first semester at college was a mess. (I'll save the details)
I was put on academic probation and I improved the second semester, so I was continued on probation for sophomore. However, my gpa is still slightly under the probation cut-off line because I slacked off again this semester.</p>

<p>I have no excuse for myself, and I want to take time off and work or do something to solve this problem.</p>

<p>I do alright up to the first midterm, but I go crazy after the first midterm. This pattern has happened to me three times and I don't know how to solve this. So I'm scared to go back.</p>

<p>But the problem is my parents want me to hang in there and just graduate. And since my parents are the ones who are thankfully paying my tuition, I need to take their advices into account; so what should I do? (I even hope I be dismissed so that I can get myself together..)</p>

<p>So my question is.. Why can't I grow up? I know in my head what the right things are, but I always mess up.. and should I try talking to my parents about taking time off?...</p>

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I know in my head what the right things are, but I always mess up

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<p>College clearly doesn't agree with you. I think taking time off and working would be a great idea. I'm sure you're over 18, so it's totally your call. I assume that what you call "working" means supporting yourself, getting your own place and not sponging off of parental money. </p>

<p>College is a great idea, but if you're not mature enough to handle it, it's a total waste of resources that would be better spent a few years later after you mature, when you really want it, appreciate what it can offer and have a better attitude. On the other hand, you may find that you don't really ever want it and will find a productive way to earn a living anyway. Many people do just fine without college. Learning to survive on your own can be quite educational. </p>

<p>Recognizing that you need to mature is actually quite mature, so give yourself some credit.</p>

<p>You have invested 3 semesters in college with likely at least another 5 to go to get a degree even with no academic issues. You have given college a fair trial without success. Your parents need to realize that you can't continue to "just hang in there" and expect to graduate. The upper level courses, those for your major, build on what you have done in the first two years. It won't magically get easier to do the work- in fact, with lousy grades so far you won't be prepared for the courses. You know this, your parents need to understand this. Time for them to get a reality check.</p>

<p>I agree that you are more mature than you give yourself credit for. You have identified why you get bad grades- you aren't ready for college at this point. In the future your prior record will determine any future college options. Try to have as few black marks on your record/transcript as possible. If it's not too late this semester try to get the best grades you can. Tell, don't ask, your parents that you will not be returning next semester. It is a lot cheaper for them to not pay tuition for a semester you will not complete successfully. Have concrete plans for a job, housing, insurance et al to support yourself.</p>

<p>You are growing up. You have identified that you have a problem attending college at this point in your life. You have considered dropping out instead of just continuing. Now keep moving forward and figure out your next step. Have the courage to talk with your parents. Also make use of your college's student counseling center- part of your student fees pay for it. Someone there should be able to direct you to resources to help you deal with your problems with school and figuring out what to do. A professional at your college may help you figure out why you keep setting yourself up for failure- it is helpful to know.</p>

<p>It is scary to change directions. But it is better to do it now before wasting more of your time floundering. Good luck.</p>