If I Had One Piece Of Advice To Give . . .

<p>The UA forum here on CC is a treasure trove of wisdom. As the class of 2014 prepares to begin its journey, I was wondering if the current students, parents, alumni, and any other interested parties who visit here would be willing to share their responses in completing the following sentence stem: </p>

<p>"If I had one piece of advice to give an incoming freshman on how to have a successful first year of college, it would be______________."</p>

<p>I know we all have more than one piece of advice to give, but I figured if I asked for only one, it would make it less burdensome and perhaps generate variety, given that the definition of success varies from person to person. </p>

<p>Thank you and Roll Tide!</p>

<p>Take advantage of many of the Week of Welcome activities - especially if you didn't do Outdoor Action or Alabama Action. Those activities are good sources of new friendships.</p>

<p>Also join whatever clubs/groups there are associated with your major.</p>

<p>Relax and keep a smile/pleasant expression on your face much/most of the time. No one wants to approach someone with an unfriendly expression on their face! LOL</p>

<p>it would be to listen to others, really listen to them, and if you disagree with them, don't take it too personally. Be open to new ideas, but not afraid to share yours. </p>

<p>Also, take time to just be. Let the waters settle now and then, and inspiration will come. </p>

<p>Finally, four years go by so fast. Do not take them for granted. And don't take the ones around you for granted. If you make real friends in college, they will be there for you the rest of your life.</p>

<p>My advice is: schedule study and reading time in DAILY as if it were a class or job obligation. This will insure you should not pull a last minute "all nighter". </p>

<p>Keep in mind that some classes may only have one or two assignments graded. There is no wiggle room if you do poorly on an assignment. This is college.... don't expect any extra credit. Welcome to adulthood.</p>

<p>Oh, I thought of another bit of advice: </p>

<p>When it comes to room mates or suite mates, YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE BEST FRIENDS! You don't need to tell your roomies your whole life story. Leave the "drama" behind. First impressions are important. The key to a successful living environment is RESPECT. Establish early on what is communal and what is off limits. At the beginning of any new living arrangement, you may be very opened to sharing your things. Then as the year goes on, you may have a resident mooch. It may be small things like shampoo or toothpaste. Be diplomatic when you address your concern ASAP rather than tollerating it and have a blowout argument. Never retaliate. Be the adult in these situations.</p>

<p>These are all gems. Thank you.</p>

<p>Please keep them coming. Don't be shy.</p>

<p>If I had to offer a piece of advice, it would be the words I say to all of my students.</p>

<p>Do your job and make a difference. </p>

<p>You are not just in college to go to class, attend a football game or hang out with some cool friends. You should be looking for a way to make a difference in the life of someone else.</p>

<p>Volunteer to tutor elementary school kids. Collect food for the less fortunate at the holidays. Help out at a local church. Clean up the lake so the ducks don't have to swim in a sea of trash. Get involved in student government and help make policy that will help others. Play in the band or sing in a choir because you love it. Work to recruit students to a particular program that you are passionate about.</p>

<p>You will meet some great people when you do these things ... and lots more.</p>

<p>(Oh, and give blood. I sponsor our National Honor Society at our high school. We do blood drive twice a year. Many of those kids will go onto college and continue to donate.)</p>

<p>If I had one piece of advice to give, it would be to take advantage of the opportunities that interest you. College is full of opportunities, some good, some bad, and some in between. If something sounds interesting, try it out. Just remember that actions have consequences and that what you do today may effect future opportunities. Additionally, don't be afraid try new things. College is a great time to break out of your shell and discover yourself and the universe(s) that surround you. You may be surprised at what you find.</p>

<p>My advice is to remember the reciprocating axiom: With freedom comes responsibility; with responsibility comes freedom. </p>

<p>Take care of business and the rewards will follow.</p>

<p>If you find yourself struggling at all in a class, get help! There are usually plenty of tutors around that can help a lot. If you wait too long, it will be hard to catch up.</p>

<p>Develop an entrepreneurial spirit. College is the best place to start a business. Who knows what it may become.</p>

<p>I got this advice from my 5th grade teacher and it works. </p>

<p>Don't wait until the day before a test to study. You'll be too nervous to really absorb what you need to know. Instead, begin studying a few days before so that you'll be relaxed enough to learn/relearn the info. Then, on the night before, skim over your book/notes to refresh your memory.</p>

<p>When it comes to room mates or suite mates, YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE BEST FRIENDS! **You don't need to tell your roomies your whole life story.</p>

<p>Very good advice....for one thing, college can be a new beginning so no need to rehash any old issues. Plus, you don't know if you can trust new acquaintances with your personal info/issues...some might use it against you.</p>

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Don't wait until the day before a test to study. You'll be too nervous to really absorb what you need to know. Instead, begin studying a few days before so that you'll be relaxed enough to learn/relearn the info. Then, on the night before, skim over your book/notes to refresh your memory.

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<p>The value of this advice was driven home to me last week when I began working with a young man who is a rising sophomore at a prestigious university. He entered college with an SAT score of 2300+ and a monster GPA. Thinking he could coast on his rather considerable brain power, he stepped onto the slippery slope of procrastination his freshman year, nailed a sub-2.0 GPA, and is now on academic probation. </p>

<p>Seems he forgot that success is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration.</p>