Immigrant

<p>I was born in China and came to America when i was 8. I did not know a single word of English and now, i am a junior and ranked 2 out of 452. I have a 2190.
Does the fact that i was an immigrant help me at all in the college admission process? Or the fact that both none of my relatives were educated in America? (Both of my parents do have masters degrees, though.)
Also, if this does help me, how can i use this to my advantage?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Also, if this does help me, how can i use this to my advantage?

[/quote]

it won't help you at schools like Harvard/Stanford/MIT/etc. where a lot of other Asians are already applying. it will help you at a lot of Southern schools and any other school that Asians don't typically apply to (i don't think many Asians apply to LACs).</p>

<p>for those schools without a lot of asian applicants, it would not even matter if i was an immigrant or not. just the fact that i'm asian would probably do for them. </p>

<p>So... this looks a big NO...</p>

<p>what are your ECs?</p>

<p>if you were in a club like Amnesty International that in my opinion would be VERY interesting, since the Chinese government actually restricts access to the group's website. being an international would differentiate you from other kids in the club: you would provide an international perspective.</p>

<p>i think that more liberal schools like Brown/etc. would be very interested in this sort of thing.</p>

<p>Schools to look at:</p>

<p>Vandy, Emory, GIT, Tulane as matches. I would suggest LACs as well.</p>

<p>see, i'm not really into the humanities. i'm more of a science/math person; i would probably end up being a doctor or an engineer or a research scientist; definitely something along those lines. since i live in the bay area, i would probably end up going to Berkeley.</p>

<p>Now that you mention it, Amnesty International does seem very interesting... :)
but how does this really fit in with my career aspirations?</p>

<p>^^^
what do you want to be? it can always fit as long as you are creative. plus, colleges don't really care about whether or not you show aspiration about a certain career. i think they care more about you either being the best at one thing or you being multi-dimensional/pursuing different interests.</p>

<p>EDIT:
i didn't see the other post.</p>

<p>
[quote]
see, i'm not really into the humanities. i'm more of a science/math person; i would probably end up being a doctor or an engineer or a research scientist; definitely something along those lines. since i live in the bay area, i would probably end up going to Berkeley.

[/quote]

we are kind of similar then except for that i only dislike english/literature but like history and government... anyways, being in Amnesty International suggests that you are aware of things like human rights and care about people. well that fits perfectly if you want to be a doctor. (another thing that fits perfectly with being a doctor is being a tutor.) as for fitting with being an engineer, it doesn't really fit but it would definitely distinguish you from the stereotypical science/math ones.</p>

<p>just so you know, colleges like to see that your ECs make sense. a lot of people will justify their ECs by saying they're related to what they want to do in life: that's fine. however, if it doesn't necessarily fit, like with being an engineer, then don't force it or don't think that you shouldn't do it. in your case i would think that your background would be reason enough for becoming interested in human rights and international affairs.</p>

<p>interesting.. this is dumb of me, but i never thought much about how all extracurriculars can tie in with future goals. I have always just thought of them as opportunities to showcase quirky talents. Thanks for your help.</p>