Interesting Admissions Process?

<p>In my freshman and sophomore years, especially freshman, I was very undisciplined and as a result ended up with horrible grades. Halfway through my sophomore year I started picking it up and finished the rest of my high school education pretty well. </p>

<p>I got a GPA at least above 3.6 or so for my last 2 years, taking 4 AP classes and a few other advanced/acc classes. I also got 2170 on my SAT, 790 on Math II and 710 on Physics. I played multiple sports in high school, participated in plays, sang in choir and played instruments. I also live in Michigan with family who have attended the school. I thought I was pretty well off when it came to getting into UM. </p>

<p>In the end I was deferred, wait-listed and then denied. UM says they look carefully at your file but I feel like maybe, because my cumulative GPA was 2.9 including 9th grade, they couldn't look past that, or even, with the sheer numbers or applicants, only looked at that?</p>

<p>Why would they pick you when somebody else did all that and didn't screw around for a year and a half? It was a mistake to think you were in pretty good shape with a 2.9.</p>

<p>Because, at least how I see it, high school grades should be used to predict how well a student WILL do in college not how well they did 4 years ago.</p>

<p>
[quote]
high school grades should be used to predict how well a student WILL do in college not how well they did 4 years ago

[/quote]

You got a 2.9. Accordingly, your outlook wouldn't be that great...</p>

<p>Aside from the 2.9, the 3.6 your last two years is unimpressive.</p>

<p>Point completely missed sharkfin. Trends show that I should get a 4.0 in college. It's shallow thinking like yours that screwed me over. </p>

<p>Regardless, maybe I was just looking for support or answers after this disappointing outcome. It's apparent I'm not getting any here. Let this die.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Point completely missed sharkfin. Trends show that I should get a 4.0 in college. It's shallow thinking like yours that screwed me over.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>What trend would that be? I fail to see anything that could predict you would get a 4.0 (or anywhere near that) in college.</p>

<p>An improving trend finishing my senior year with a high performance. I don't think you read the whole post..the low gpa is almost exclusively from 9th grade year.</p>

<p>You can always transfer. </p>

<p>You obviously have the determination and are hungry to go to Michigan, but a 2.9 as a final GPA is very low...</p>

<p>Do well at your college and transfer in. It should be easy, especially since your instate.</p>

<p>
[quote]

Point completely missed sharkfin. Trends show that I should get a 4.0 in college. It's shallow thinking like yours that screwed me over.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>No joke, but a 4.0 at UMich is VERY VERY hard to get. Your high school GPA is a poor predictor of how well you do in college. Because even if you're working really hard and you make use of study groups/office hours, there's still a good chance of not getting that highly coveted A. People who had strong HS GPAs and ended up at UMich sometimes don't even come close to a 4.0. </p>

<p>It sucks that you didn't get what you wanted this time around. Just work really hard in your college - you know from high school that being lazy hurt you in the end, so that should keep you motivated where ever you go. Expect to be challenged at the college you go to, but don't run away from the challenge and don't be afraid to ask questions and get help when you need it. When you're not making use of campus resources, you're actually being the stupid one ... you paid for those resources!</p>

<p>If you're doing well during your sophomore year of college, try and apply to UMich. If they don't let you in again, keep working hard wherever you are, and try again for grad school! There was a PhD in my lab who kinda screwed up high school so he went to Cal Poly (3rd tier school in California), so he worked really hard there and ended up at UMich's Comp Sci PhD program, which is a HUGE step up, and that's what will catch everyone's attention.</p>

<p>Remember what happened in high school is over and set in stone. Get over it, keep that behind you, and hope for better days to come.</p>

<p>Good luck!</p>

<p>Yeah ab2013, I didn't mean 4.0 entirely literally. I just meant that my performance will be a lot higher in college than the average of my high school performance.</p>

<p>Well, you understood the main gist of what I said right, because I spent a solid 10-15 minutes typing it up?</p>

<p>Yeah I do, and I appreciate a thought out post. I made this thread in a fit of anger seeing all of my friends getting ready to move in at UM and regret it now. </p>

<p>I feel like over the last 2 years I've made an effort to change my ways and it didn't make a difference, but in the end I do have to take responsibility for my mistakes, even if a few years old. It's too bad these posts are forever.</p>

<p>Wagon120, its great that you know that you have to take responsibility for your past mistakes. The university most likely did not see your rising potential as valid proof that you will succeed in its rigorous courses. Perhaps they thought you wouldn't take the first two years of college seriously. Regardless, the only thing you can do now is to take your first one or two college years seriously (wherever you go) and transfer afterwards if you still have a desire to go to UofM. After this, I don't think UofM will heavily weigh your first two years in high school heavily at all.</p>

<p>Well I got a 3.3 in H.S. and Now I have a better GPA in college. I'm also a URM. I guess an upward trend can show that you are motivated to do well in college, but a sub 3.0 GPA will make your chances at undergraduate admission very difficult. You could always transfer in like people have stated above. Do well at a community college or four year university and transfer.</p>

<p>Also I thought UM only looks at your sophomore, junior and if you are deferred, first year semester senior grades. I thought freshman grades didn't count.</p>

<p>Well, unless your high school is a top 100 high school America's</a> Best High Schools: Gold Medal List - US News and World Report, I don't think you even have a chance to say that 3.6 is an indicative trend that will improve in umich. I know rankings don't mean much but since it does base the rankings on college preparedness, I'm using it as an argument here. If the high school is college-oriented, then MAYBE we might see a trend. You're telling the admission officers to theorize you'll improve from a 3.6 in high school to 3.6+ in a totally different environment? That's most likely not going to happen when they have people with 4.0s challenging to be the graduating with honors at Umich. </p>

<p>You may be improving, but since your GPA is 2.9 with a few 3.5-3.6 averaged in, I can't image what your freshmen GPAs were. You better have an amazing essay to explain what happened and an even better story to explain what changed you (albeit the change wasn't that impressive, you went from below average to slightly average in umich terms). I know college admissions like to see an upward trend but that is being weighted too heavily when it's from a 2.0 GPA to a 3.5. Maybe if you got a few 4.0 and a great essay to explain this you might inspire them that you'll do well in college.</p>

<p>See I had a bad freshmen year too and can relate. I never studied or paid attention in class but I considered a 3.6 (90/100 converted) horrible and I got myself up to 95/100. So clearly we have different views on what horrible is. I would start looking for other schools and consider Michigan a deep reach, especially if you're OOS. Maybe if you had say a 3.5~ GPA with all those other stats it could be a reach/high target.</p>

<p>I was going to stop posting and bumping this thread that I want to die, but I had to respond to this last post. </p>

<p>I never meant to to flaunt the 3.6 as impressive, and it's only an estimate of my minimum GPA over the last 2 years with my senior year being higher. I did also, in fact, attend a college prep school in Michigan, taking some of the hardest classes offered.</p>

<p>"You can always transfer. </p>

<p>You obviously have the determination and are hungry to go to Michigan, but a 2.9 as a final GPA is very low...</p>

<p>Do well at your college and transfer in. It should be easy, especially since your instate."</p>

<p>Cloudy cloud. I don't know why so many out of state people think it's so easy to transfer into U-M, even with good grades. It really isn't.</p>

<p>If he did get good college grades, though, his HS performance doesnt necessarily hurt him too badly-- I had a similar performance in high school and was able to get in as a two year transfer. I had a 3.7, though, which is not necessarily easy to get.</p>

<p>I am not disagreeing with your post, rjk, he should just know that he isn't necessarily screwed forever if he is still interested in Michigan. Though getting in as a transfer is not the cakewalk people seem to think it is like you said, he still has the potential for a good chance if he does well. I wouldn't want him to misunderstand what you're saying.</p>

<p>rjkovnovi, I was simply stating what Emaheevul07 said. He is an instate student with an upward high school trend. If he was to have a GPA of 3.5+ with a challenging curriculum, he should be fine. </p>

<p>The OP seems to be really down about not getting into Michigan. I was trying to give the guy some hope.</p>