International American Citizen?

<p>please note that by law, you are loosing your PR as soon as you give up your residency in the US. It doesn't matter whether you plan to come back in a few years. As soon as you move abroad for a new job (unless you work for the US government) or other reasons then you no longer have PR. </p>

<p>In practise, you risk loosing your PR if you come back to the US after a more than 6 months trip abroad without a good expaination for your absence. For any trips up to 2 years, you could apply for a re-entry permit where you promise that you will keep your residence in the US and continue to file US tax return. However, it's not something you can apply over and over again.</p>

<p>So your argument that US citizens have to pay tax as an expate doesn't even matter here.</p>

<p>However I do agree that there are disadvantages to being a US citzen
- in some parts of the world, you might want to hide the fact that you are a US citzen if you want to survive
- the introduction of the draft is a very possible scenario I think with the current foreign policy
- what I discovered when I was in China is that US citizens are the only group of people ineligible for the Special Entry Permit which makes it much harder to get into China from Hong Kong etc. for a day trip. Americans seems to be singled out for no reason.
- there are probably a lot more I don't know yet</p>

<p>And I don't think the US is unwelcoming to foreigner. In fact, it's much easier to gain PR or citizenship in the US than most other countries. Try Germany and good luck with that.... I've known people who have been born in Germany & stayed there 22 years straight, and still have not gotten citizenship.</p>

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And I don't think the US is unwelcoming to foreigner. In fact, it's much easier to gain PR or citizenship in the US than most other countries. Try Germany and good luck with that.... I've known people who have been born in Germany & stayed there 22 years straight, and still have not gotten citizenship.

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<p>Different citizenship laws for different places. US citizenship laws are primarily based on the principle of jus soli while German citizenship laws are based on jus sanguinis. </p>

<p>It will be very hard for a non-ethnic German to get German citizenship - but conversely any one of German ethnic origin or the descendant of such a person is granted German citizenship quite easily so long as you can prove some language skills and cultural affiliation.</p>